CSRFF guidelines

2019–2020 funding round

About CSRFF

The Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund (CSRFF) exemplifies the Western Australian Government’s commitment to the development of sustainable infrastructure for sport and recreation across the State.

The purpose of the program is to provide financial assistance to community groups and local governments to develop basic infrastructure for sport and recreation. The program aims to maintain or increase participation in sport and recreation with an emphasis on physical activity, through rational development of good quality, well-designed and well-utilised facilities.

Through CSRFF, the Western Australian Government will invest $12 million in the 2019–2020 financial year towards the development of quality physical environments in which people can enjoy sport and recreation. The maximum grant offered for standard grant applications is one third of the total estimated project cost (excluding GST) up to a maximum grant of $2 million.

The Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries (DLGSC) will assess the total eligible cost of your project (excluding GST) from the information provided.

Some applications will be eligible for up to one half of the project cost. This eligibility will be measured against key development principles. Applicants will have to show their eligibility through the development bonus section of the application form. Meeting Development Bonus criteria will not automatically ensure the applicant is eligible for 50% of the project cost. Applicants will need to return unspent funds to DLGSC in accordance with the terms of the grant agreement.

Priority consideration

CSRFF can fund new or upgraded facilities which will maintain or increase physical activity, or result in a more rational use of facilities. Priority will be given to projects that lead to facility sharing and rationalisation. Multi-purpose facilities reduce infrastructure required to meet similar needs and increase sustainability. The program is not designed to provide facilities to meet a club’s ambitions to compete in a higher grade.

Examples of projects which will be considered for funding include:

  • New playing surfaces e.g. ovals, courts, synthetic surfaces etc.
  • Floodlighting
  • Change rooms and ablutions
  • Sports storage
  • Clubrooms including social space, kitchen, administration areas and viewing areas. Please note that these areas have a minimal impact on physical activity and would be considered a lower priority.
  • Resurfacing of existing sports surfaces. It is expected that facility managers will budget for these items as part of the ongoing operation of the facility, frequently over 7 to 10 years, and will be considered a low priority for funding. If successful the project is likely to attract reduced funding of 16.66%. In competitive rounds it is unlikely that these projects will receive funding.

Funds will not be available for:

  • Projects that commence before approvals are announced.
  • Development of privately owned facilities.
  • Arts, music, craft and non-physical recreation facilities.
  • Facilities considered to be a full State Government responsibility proposed by either government departments, schools or parents and citizen associations, unless there is demonstrated community sporting and recreation need/benefit commensurate with the funding request.
  • Recurring maintenance or operating costs of existing facilities.
  • Purchase of land, landscaping, carparks and access roads.
  • Playgrounds.
  • Bikeways or pathways.
  • Non land-based facilities, e.g. boat launching ramps, ocean pools and marinas.
  • Non-fixed equipment.
  • Fixed sports specific equipment (e.g. electronic targets, scoreboards).
  • Facilities or fixtures for the express purpose of serving alcohol.
  • Projects that do not meet Australian Standards and National Construction Code.
  • Projects that have already received a CSRFF grant and are seeking an additional grant to meet cost increases.
  • Applicants/projects that have received a CSRFF grant in the past and have not satisfactorily acquitted that grant. In some cases this may apply to localities where other significant projects have not been progressed or have not completed a previous project in accordance with the conditions of the grant provided. An assessment will be made and if no physical progress has occurred, new applications may not be recommended.
  • Projects that have State Government funding in excess of 66.66% of the total project cost.
    Local government overheads, project administration and project management (unless expressly approved in the grant agreement).

Level of funding available

An amount of $12 million will be allocated in the 2019–2020 financial year.

The maximum grant offered for standard grant applications is one third of the total estimated project cost (excluding GST) up to a maximum grant of $2 million. DLGSC will assess the total eligible cost of your project (excluding GST) from the information provided. Any ineligible items shown as eligible will be deducted from the eligible project cost. This may result in the funding eligible for your project being less than the amount you have requested.

Through a development bonus, some applications will be eligible for up to one half of the project cost. This eligibility will be measured against key development principles. Applicants will have to show their eligibility through the development bonus section of the application form. Meeting development bonus criteria will not automatically ensure the applicant is eligible for 50% of the project cost.

DLGSC will assess the total eligible cost of your project (excluding GST) from the information provided. Any ineligible items shown as eligible will be deducted from the eligible project cost. This may result in the funding eligible for your project being less than the amount you have requested.

The department does not guarantee you will receive the full amount of financial assistance requested or the maximum level of funding. The level of financial assistance offered will be based on the overall significance of the proposed project, including the benefits provided to the community. Receiving financial assistance under this program does not guarantee future stages of your project will be funded.

There is no obligation on your local government to make a contribution to a community group project however a contribution from all stakeholders (local government or community club/group) in a project that meets local needs will be viewed more favourably.

State Government funding for any project cannot exceed two thirds of the total project cost.

Life cycle cost guidelines

An important part of the funding process is to make sure the community can bear the true cost of running and maintaining a facility well into the future.

Developing a life cycle cost approach when considering your project’s parameters will provide you with a solid and informed base from which to make the most effective financial, economic and operationally sustainable decisions. This life cycle assessment should be undertaken in the planning of any project so all parties have an understanding of the upfront, ongoing and replacement costs over the life of the project.

A life cycle cost analysis must be provided for projects with a total cost over $500,000.

The department will undertake spot audits of funded projects over their life cycle to ensure than grantees are meeting the obligations they outline in their grant application. Local Governments are encouraged to outline in their project assessments how they will monitor their sporting groups and provide advice to the department on an ongoing basis.

Please refer to our Life Cycle Cost Guidelines.

Sinking fund

A sinking fund is established by setting aside revenue over a period of time to meet future capital expenses. The annual amount to be set aside is determined by the expected life of the asset using the formula:

Expected cost of replacement (including inflation) divided by the expected number of years before replacement

For example, a club may set aside $15,000 from club revenue each year to replace a $150,000 synthetic surface in 10 years.

The responsibility for maintaining and operating a facility rests with the local government, the club or a combination of both. It is important that CSRFF applicants can demonstrate they can maintain the facility by developing a sinking fund for asset replacement. Local governments, as the asset owner, are expected to ensure that part of their assessment of a project includes confirmation they will underwrite any shortfalls.

Resurfacing of existing sporting surfaces is an example of a project where a sinking fund will be required following a successful application. Typically, synthetic sporting surfaces have a life of 7 to 10 years over which a facility owner/manager is expected to budget for the operation and replacement of the surface at the end of life via the development of a sinking fund and an annual contribution to the fund.

It should be noted that resurfacing projects are a low priority and where the applicant has previously been funded through CSRFF, the project is likely to attract reduced funding of 16.66%. In competitive rounds it is unlikely that these projects will receive funding.

The department will undertake spot audits of funded projects to ensure than grantees are meeting the obligations they outline in their grant application for replacement. Local governments are encouraged to outline in their project assessments how they will monitor their sporting groups and provide advice to the department on an ongoing basis.

Female facility improvements

CSRFF prioritises projects that improve the usability of facilities for female participants. To encourage female participation funding has been set aside in the funding round for projects that support female participation.

Projects that address this issue, such as the upgrade of change rooms to cater for females including lockable, individual showers and more toilet cubicles in lieu of urinals, will be a priority. Facility audits will also be considered for funding so that a future project can be appropriately scoped and designed.
Sustainability initiatives

$1 million is allocated each round out of the $12 million available to projects that demonstrate sustainability principles/outcomes. Sustainability principles include reduction in energy or water use, minimisation of building waste, green-building design, efficient pool heating and capacity to self-fund maintenance. Only upgrades to existing facilities will be considered as part of this allocation. The maximum sustainability initiative grant available is $500,000.

The department encourages all new facilities to incorporate sustainability initiatives in their design.
Aboriginal projects

$500,000 is notionally allocated each round out of the $12 million available to projects that provide sport and recreation infrastructure to remote Aboriginal communities and regional communities with a significant Aboriginal population.

Voluntary labour

Voluntary labour is work undertaken by people, without compensation or reward.

The value of work undertaken by volunteers can be included in the applicant’s contribution. Voluntary labour is allowable up to $50,000 in value, however the grantee’s cash contribution must match any non-cash contribution to the project.

Administration of projects, preparation of applications, claim forms, documentation, etc, is not recognised as a claimable item. In general local government staff hours will not be recognised.
Voluntary labour can be classified as follows:

Unskilled

General work is being undertaken where no recognised qualification is required. This includes work that is supervised by a skilled person and labourers.

Skilled

A person with a recognised qualification specific to the work to be undertaken, i.e. trades person, grader driver, truck driver, etc.

Professional

A person with a formal tertiary qualification specific to the work to be undertaken, i.e. architectural, legal, engineering, surveying work or similar.

Charge-out rates

  • Unskilled voluntary labour is calculated at a rate no greater than $25 per hour.
  • Skilled voluntary labour is calculated at a rate of up to $40 per hour.
  • Professional voluntary labour is calculated at a rate of up to $60 per hour.
  • Voluntary labour must be recorded on a Schedule of Voluntary Labour, which must be endorsed by the local government (Appendix 16). This can be included as part of the overall project cost when making a claim.

Donated materials

Donated materials can be recognised as part of an applicant’s contribution (see examples at the end of this section). Donated materials must be recorded on a Schedule of Donated Materials, which must be endorsed by the local government (Appendix 17).

There is no limit on donated materials, however the applicant’s non-cash contribution cannot exceed the applicant’s cash contribution to the project.

Any local government cash/labour/machinery/materials is to be costed as part of the applicant’s cash contribution, not as voluntary labour or donated materials. However, certain services are considered to be part of the local governments normal function, i.e. shire engineers and administration/finance staff, and costs associated will not be recognised.

Donated materials may not be recognised where the donor is the supplier or contractor involved in the project. It is essential that the applicant completes a valid tender process before considering donations or discounts related to suppliers and contractors.

Note: If the supplier or contractor provides materials at the wholesale price or lower, then the difference between the retail price and the wholesale price may be recognised as a donation, (i.e. it has to be demonstrated that the donor is foregoing their profit component in favour of the applicant/project).

  • The intent is to prevent suppliers or contractors simply scaling up components or project costs to secure a greater level of grant.
  • The applicant is to provide satisfactory supporting evidence to establish the value of donated material, e.g. A letter or an invoice from the supplier stating the value of the donation and how or on what basis the valuation was made.
  • Cash donations form part of a grantee’s cash contribution.
  • Donated land – neither a local government nor an applicant can claim donated land as part of their contribution.
  • Land purchased by the applicant – the funds spent by an applicant on purchasing the land for the facility is not allowable as part of the applicants contribution.
  • The donation is a sponsorship.

Examples of voluntary labour/donated materials

There are a variety of voluntary labour and/or donated materials combinations possible. Applicants must first estimate the total cost of the project and then work backwards to see if the method by which they intend to fund the project is allowable. The most important rules are:

  1. CSRFF contribution will not exceed 1/2 of the GST exclusive project cost (or the percentage of funding approved as per application).
  2. The applicant’s non-cash contribution must be matched by the applicant’s cash contribution. Local government donations in cash or kind are treated as cash contributions by the applicant.
  3. Voluntary labour cannot exceed $50,000.

How do I apply?

You must contact your nearest department office to discuss your project in order to be eligible for funding. There are nine regional offices located throughout Western Australia.

Application forms are available from your nearest department office (regional WA) and local government (metro area only). A draft for information purposes can be downloaded.

Eligibility – who can apply?

Applicants must be either a local government or a not-for-profit sport, recreation or community organisation incorporated under the WA Associations Incorporation Act 1987 and have an Australian Business Number (ABN). Clubs must demonstrate equitable access to the public on a short term and casual basis.

The land on which the facility is to be developed must be one of the following:

  • Crown reserve
  • Land owned by a public authority
  • Municipal property
  • Land held for public purposes by trustees under a valid lease, title or trust deed that adequately protects the interests of the public.

Grant categories

CSRFF small grants

Small grants will be awarded to projects involving a basic level of planning. The total project cost for small grants must not exceed $200,000. Grants given in this category must be claimed by 15 June in the relevant financial year. Please see page 11 for an overview of the small grants application process.

Examples of small grant projects:

  • Cricket pitch and practice wickets
  • Storage upgrades
  • Changerooms refurbishments
  • Safety fences for sport and recreation facilities, i.e. ballistic sports
  • Small floodlighting projects
  • Court surface conversion
  • Large scale dams, water collection systems and pipelines for distribution (maximum grant offered is $60,000)
  • Various planning studies to a maximum grant amount of $25,000

Value of total project

$7500 to $200,000 exclusive of GST.

Value of grant

  • Minimum grant of $2,500.
  • Maximum grant of $66,666

Note the maximum grant may increase to 50% funding if a development bonus is approved.

Management

Generally, small grant projects will not require a facility manager to be assigned to the project.

Planning process

The skills required to plan a project supported by a small grant will be simple and generally readily accessible to the local community.

Impact on the community

Projects are generally local in scale.

Grant funds

Grant funds for small grant projects must be claimed by 15 June in the relevant financial year.

Under the CSRFF small grants program applicants can receive an upfront payment of their grant. Payment will be made to an applicant upon the signing of a works contract (copy of signed contract to be provided to the department) or where no formal works contract exists, payment will be determined on a case by case basis in consultation with the applicant. Upon completion of a project the applicant will be required to acquit the grant by providing CSRFF claim forms and sufficient evidence of expenditure. If the project is delivered under budget, then grant monies not expended will need to be returned to the department.

CSRFF annual grants

Annual grants will be awarded to projects with a planning and construction process that will be complete within 12 months and have a total project cost (exclusive of GST) of $200,001–$500,000. Grants given in this category must be claimed by 15 June in the next financial year.

Examples of annual projects:

  • Upgrades to clubrooms/pavilions
  • Large floodlighting projects
  • Court or bowling green construction
  • Reticulation system for a grassed playing field

Value of total project

$200,001 to $500,000, exclusive of GST.

Value of grant

  • Minimum grant of $66,667
  • Maximum grant of $166,666

Note the maximum grant may increase to 50% funding if a development bonus is approved.

Management

Generally, annual projects will not require a facility manager to be assigned to the project.

Planning process

The skills required to plan a project supported by an annual grant will be simple and generally readily accessible to the local community. Some fundamental research and planning may be required. Applicants for annual grants are required to address the questions in the application form. Consultation with the department will assist in understanding what is required.

Impact on the community

Projects are generally neighbourhood to district level in scale.

Grant funds

Grant funds for annual projects must be claimed in the next financial year.

Forward planning grants

Forward planning grants will be given to the more complex projects that require a planning period of between one and three years. Grants in this category will have a total project cost (exclusive of GST) of over $500,001 and may be allocated in one or a combination of the years in the next triennium.

Examples of forward planning grant projects:

  • Multipurpose leisure/recreation centre
  • Swimming pool – new or major upgrade including heating to allow increased use
  • Construction of large synthetic fields
  • Playing field construction
  • Clubroom – new or major upgrade
  • Large ablution block/change rooms

Funding availability

Most applicants request funding in the first year but few achieve any physical progress. Major projects require time to prepare and for appropriate processes to be followed.

Applicants are given the opportunity to indicate their preferred year(s) of claim on the application form, however, as funds are limited, there is no guarantee that their preferred year(s) of claim will coincide with the year of offer. It may also be necessary to allocate funding to some larger projects over two or three financial years. Most projects will have funding allocated in Years 2 or 3 of the triennium.

Where applicants request funding in Year 1, all planning documentation must be in place to allow such progress to occur, e.g. architectural drawings, building approvals, other funding.

Value of total project

$500,001 and over, exclusive of GST.

Value of grant

  • Minimum grant of $166,667
  • Maximum grant of $2,000,000

Management

Projects will usually require a full-time or part-time manager to be assigned to the facility in order to control usage and maintenance.

Planning process

The skills required to plan this type of project will be highly developed in a technical and/or administrative sense — some expertise may need to be obtained from outside the local community. Applicants are required to address the questions in the application form. Comprehensive research and planning will be required.

It is anticipated that forward planning projects will require between one and three years to complete from start to finish.

Projects of regional significance should have been identified within a regional sport and recreation facilities plan and are supported by a range of local governments.

Impact on the community

Projects will generally be of either district or regional level.

Assessment of application

Throughout the planning process you must liaise with DLGSC officers to ensure that you adequately address the assessment criteria and that information in your application can be clearly understood. The emphasis of the assessment factors is on a planned approach to facility provision and will require the applicant to demonstrate need and to consider planning, design, and management issues to substantiate the need for the proposed project.

Officers assessing applications will provide a rating against the level of project consultation. Where no consultation has occurred, the rating will be zero which will affect your chances of obtaining a grant. To apply for a development bonus, you must contact your nearest DLGSC office in order to determine whether you are eligible to apply.

The key principles of facility provision

The key principles of facility provision explains in depth the principles against which applications for CSRFF funding will be assessed. Your application will be assessed on the quality of information you provide and how well this information meets the key assessment criteria. You must answer each question in the application form and supply all requested information.

Assessments have been based on the following criteria:

  • Project justification
  • Planned approach
  • Community consultation
  • Management planning
  • Access and opportunity
  • Design
  • Financial viability
  • Coordination
  • Potential to increase physical activity
  • Sustainability.

Further details are available in the department’s document Key Principles of Facilities Provision.

Joint provision and shared use of facilities is a priority consideration for CSRFF support. It is not a scheme to ensure separate facilities of equal standard for all clubs. It is not designed to provide facilities to meet a club’s ambitions to compete in a higher grade.

Projects must also demonstrate that they can be delivered within the funding period. Projects will be assessed against the scope, time and budget being proposed. You must demonstrate that your project will be completed within the nominated timeframe.

Local government involvement

Applicants must liaise with their local government regarding planning and building approvals pertinent to their project. Your local government will assess all relevant applications and is to rank applications in priority order for the municipality.

No distinctions should be made in the ranking, between local governments, applicants, forward planning or annual projects.

State Sporting Association involvement

Applicants must liaise with their State Sporting Association to discuss the project. State Sporting Associations are involved in the assessment of applications and may be able to provide valuable information when planning your project, particularly on information related to technical design issues.
Advice from all of the above forms part of the assessment of your project.

Application process and timeline

Your application form, together with the supporting documentation required, must be submitted to your local council by the relevant date outlined in the application process and timeline section. Please note that many local governments will close the application period sooner to accommodate council meeting schedules. It is recommended that you check the closing date for CSRFF applications with your local government to avoid missing out.

More information on CSRFF timeframes.

Conditions of grant

Funding under this program is administered in accordance with the grant agreement, which is executed by successful applicants. An abridged version of the grant agreement is below — please note actual conditions may differ at time of grant acceptance:

  1. The State Government’s grant will only be available up to 15 June in the financial year(s) in which it is offered (see above) and is only for use on the project approved. Grants not claimed in the year of offer may be forfeited.
  2. A grant will not exceed the stipulated percentage of the completed project cost (excluding GST), or the maximum grant offered, whichever is the lesser. DLGSC will assess the total eligible cost of your project (excluding GST) from the information provided.
  3. Where the grantee is an incorporated community group or a local government and is registered for GST, payments will be grossed up by 10% of the grant amount (see point 5 below). The DLGSC will issue a Recipient Created Tax Invoice (RCTI) with the grant payment.
  4. Where the grantee is an incorporated community group and is not registered for GST, grant payments will not be grossed up by 10% of the grant amount.
  5. With regard to Recipient Created Tax Invoices (RCTI), the department and the grantee agree that:
    1. the recipient can issue tax invoices in respect of the supplies;
    2. the supplier will not issue tax invoices in respect of the supplies;
    3. the supplier acknowledges that it is registered for GST when it enters into the agreement and that it will notify the recipient if it ceases to be registered;
    4. the recipient acknowledges that it is registered when it enters into the agreement  and that it
      will notify the supplier if it ceases to be registered for GST or if it ceases to satisfy any of the
      requirements of the Commissioner’s determination of the classes of invoices that recipients may issue; and
    5. the recipient must not issue a document that would otherwise be a RCTI, on or after that date when the recipient or the supplier has failed to comply with any of the requirements of the Commissioner’s determination of the classes of invoices that recipients may issue.
  6. Projects must comply with all laws and applicable building or construction codes, including access for persons with a disability, National Construction Code and other legislation.
  7. Before calling tenders, expression of interest or signing contracts, final plans and specifications must be submitted to DLGSC, with any other required documentation, to ensure consistency with the original approval. Subsequent alterations of plans or specifications must also be submitted to DLGSC for approval.
  8. If the grant exceeds $20,000, grantees must demonstrate to DLGSC that more than one quote has been sourced, prior to commencement of construction.
  9. For all grants the grantee is required to invite their DLGSC regional manager to sit on any Project Management Committee and acknowledge that this officer will have voting rights.
  10. Subject to all criteria being met and DLGSC written approval, projects can commence at any time following the announcement of approval. The grant allocated to your project must be claimed by 15 June of the year in which it is offered.
  11. CSRFF is a reimbursement system. Funds must be spent and receipts presented. Only project expenditure which commenced after approvals were announced will be recognised for payment. Claims must be supported with detail (receipts) satisfying audit or Financial Management Act (FMA) and Auditor Generals Act 2006 requirements.
  12. A grant may be claimed when the project is 100% complete, all payments have been acquitted, a copy of the building permit and a copy of the Certificate of Occupancy have been forwarded to DLGSC, as appropriate.
  13. Applicants are now able to claim 25% of their grant upon the signing of a major works contract. 50% of the grant may then be claimed once expenditure has reached 50%. The final 25% of the grant is to be claimed upon the completion of the project. It is important to note that the CSRFF program still primarily operates on a reimbursement basis. Grantees are required to demonstrate that the expenditure of funds has occurred prior to submitting a claim for payment.
  14. Under the CSRFF small grants program applicants can receive an upfront grant payment upon the signing of a works contract (copy of signed contract to be provided to the department) or where no formal works contract exists, payment will be determined on a case by case basis in consultation with the applicant. Upon completion of a project the applicant will be required to acquit the grant by providing the CSRFF claim forms and sufficient evidence of expenditure. If the project is delivered under budget, then grant monies not expended will need to be returned to the DLGSC in accordance with the terms of the grant agreement. Any concerns should be discussed with DLGSC at the time of application.
  15. Staged payments for major projects may be arranged.
  16. Voluntary labour can be a maximum of one-third of the project cost, but cannot exceed $50,000. Unskilled labour is calculated at $25 per hour, skilled labour at $40 per hour and professional labour at $60 per hour.
  17. Grantees are required to retain financial acquittal statements for at least three years following the date of final claim. The parties agree that, despite any provision of the conditions of grant to the contrary, the powers and responsibilities of the Auditor General under the FMA are not limited or affected by the conditions of grant.
  18. Grantees agree that the completed project may be randomly audited by DLGSC or the Office of the Auditor General, or his representative, against the submission and agreed conditions of grant. They also agree to assist with any research, evaluation, promotion and usage of the project as requested.
  19. At the completion of the project, grantees accept that they will be required to display signage acknowledging the State Government’s contribution to the project.
  20. Grantees are required to keep complete, up-to-date, accurate and detailed written records.
  21. Grantees must provide DLGSC with a detailed written report outlining the project’s progress every 90 business days or upon request from DLGSC.
  22. Neither the State or nor any agent, instrumentality or emanation of the State shall be liable in negligence for the success or otherwise fo the project or responsible for any losses or financial shortfalls based on the project.
  23. In an event of default, the State may terminate this agreement. Successful applicants should carefully read the terms of the grant agreement prior to acceptance.

State Government recognition

The State Government, through the department, provides a significant contribution to the sustainability and development of the sport and recreation industry. This is achieved through financial assistance and the provision of expertise, advice and services. It is important that recipients of this support recognise the State Government contribution during the funding relationship.

Accordingly, successful applicants are required to abide by the grant acknowledgement requirements.

Privacy Act

All information provided to the department and gathered during the grant assessment process will be stored on a database that will only be accessed by departmental personnel. The database is subject to privacy restrictions in accordance with the Privacy Act 1998 (Commonwealth) and the Freedom of Information Act 1992.

Resources for planning and managing sporting facilities

There are publications available on the department’s website which will assist you in preparing your application.

Suggested publications are: