Tennis

The dimensions of a singles and doubles tennis courts are defined in the Rules of Tennis by the International Tennis Federation (ITF).

For practical purposes the vast majority of tennis courts are built to doubles dimensions, which allows for both singles and doubles.

The court

The court is 23.77m long and for singles matches, 8.23m wide. For doubles matches the court is 10.97m wide.

The court is divided into two equal areas by a net suspended by a cord or metal cable attached to two net posts. The net is 1.07m high and is fully extended to that it fills the space between the two nets posts. The net is 0.914m high at the centre, where is held down tightly by a white strap. A white band covers the cord or metal cable and the top of the net.

For doubles matches the centre of the net posts are 0.914m outside the doubles court on each side.

For singles matches the centres of the net posts are 0.914m outside the singles court on each side.

Playing area

The overall playing area including run‑­off depends on the type of event. A guide to minimum court area requirements (single courts) is outlined in the table below.
 
With indoor courts the recommended height measured at the net from the court surface to the ceiling is 9.14m.
Minimum court area requirements
Court dimensions Club/recreation ITF (pro tour)  Stadium court 
 Total area  34.77m x 17.07m  36.6m x 18.3m  40.23m x 20.11m
 Run-off back of court  5.48m  6.4m  8.23m
 Run-off at side of court to fence  3.05m  3.66m  4.57m
 Min distance between 2 courts (unfenced)  3.66m  5.48m  N/A
 Recommended distance between  two courts (unfenced)  4.27m  N/A  N/A

Line markings

The lines at the end of the court are baselines and the lines at the sides of the court are side lines. The baseline is up to 10cm wide.
 
Service lines are two lines between the singles side lines, 6.40m from each side of the net, parallel with the net.
 
On each side of the net the area between the service line and the net are divided into two equal parts called the service courts. The line dividing the service courts is the centre service line and is drawn parallel with the singles side lines and half way between them. The centre service line is 5cm wide.
 
All other lines on the court are between 2.5cm and 5cm wide. All court measurements are made to the outside of the lines and are all the same colour, contrasting with the colour of the surface.

Singles and doubles tennis courts

10 and under tennis

As at 1 January 2012 all Tennis Australia sanctioned 10 and under competitions are played on approved smaller courts. Tennis Australia has three different court sizes for different age groups.

Court dimensions
Dimensions Small Large
Red court
Length 8.23m 10.97m
Width 3.0m 6.0m
Net height 80cm 80cm
Orange court
Length 18m
Width 6.4m
Net height 80-91.4cm
Green court
Length 23.77
Width 8.23m
Net height 91.4cm
Red court

Red court set up

Orange court

 

Orange court set up

Line markings

There are a variety of temporary or permanent options for marking lines for the red and orange courts on full sized tennis courts.

Throw‑­down lines

These are rubber or thermo plastic strips laid down on the court and can removed after each session.

Chalk

A mix of diluted chalk paint can be used to mark the temporary lines on both artificial clay and grass surfaces. Lime may be used to temporarily line red and orange courts on natural grass surfaces, but is not suitable for artificial grass courts.

Strong tape

Something similar to painter’s tape is semi‑­permanent and will last up to six months.

Permanent paint

Semi-permanent paint can be used on artificial clay and grass surfaces. When using permanent or semi‑­permanent lines, use a colour that is similar to the court surface so as not to distract players when using the full court.

 

Beach tennisSingles-and-doubles-beach-tennis-court

The court is 16m long and for doubles matches, 8m wide and for singles matches, 4.5m wide.
The court is divided in the middle by a net suspended by a cord or metal cable attached to two net posts. The net is fully extended and is 1.7m high at all part of the net. A band covered the cord or metal cable and the top of the net.

The lines of the court are between 2.5cm and 5cm wide except for the baselines which are up to 10cm wide.

The lines at the ends of the courts are baselines and the lines at the sides are called side lines. The court boundaries are marked with a coloured boundary tape that contrasts with the colour of the surface and the court measurements are made to the outside of the tape.

Boundary tapes are produced specifically for beach sports and include rubber anchors or anchor plates to fix the tape to the sand.

Playing surface

The terrain is levelled sand, as flat and uniform as possible The surface is to be free of rocks, shell and other objects that could endanger or injure any of the players.

Junior beach tennis

16 and under and 14 and under

The court is 16m long and 8m wide. The net is 1.7m high across the full width of the court.

12 and under beach tennis

The court is 14m long and 7m wide. The net is 1.5m high across the full width of the court.

References

Tennis Australia. Court and Enclosure Dimensions. Court-and-Enclosure-Dimensions-2012.pdf

Tennis Australia. Courts, Nets and Side lines 10-and-Under Tennis Rules. www.tennis.com.au

ITF Rules of Tennis. International Tennis Federation 2015. Nassau, Bahamas. http://www.itftennis.com/home.aspx

Tennis play and Stay ITF Official Program
http://www.tennisplayandstay.com/media/124413/124413.pdf

ITF Rules of Beach Tennis 2016

Sports association details

Tennis West

Michael Roberts 
Chief Executive Officer
State Tennis Centre, Victoria Park Drive Burswood WA 6100
PO Box 116 Burswood WA 6100
Telephone 08 6462 8301
Email wainfo@tennis.com.au
Website www.tennis.com.au/wa

Disclaimer

The information in this guide is general in nature and cannot be relied upon as professional advice concerning the design of, or marking out for, sporting facilities and playing areas. No assurance is given as to the accuracy of any information contained in this guide and readers should not rely on its accuracy. Readers should obtain their own independent and professional advice in relation to their proposed sporting activity.