Football (soccer)

Football is commonly known as soccer. Matches may be played on natural or artificial surfaces, according to the rules of the competition. The colour of artificial surfaces is green. 

Field markings

The field of play is rectangular and marked with lines called boundary lines. The two longer boundary lines are touch lines and the two shorter lines are goal lines. It is divided into two halves by a halfway line, which joins the midpoints of the two touch lines.

The centre mark is at the midpoint of the halfway line. A circle with a radius of 9.15m is marked around it.

Marks are made off the field of play, 9.15m from the corner arc and at right angles to the goal lines and the touch lines, to ensure defending players retreat this distance when a corner kick is taken.

The length of the touch line is greater than the length of the goal line. All lines are not more than 12cm wide.
Length (touch line): Minimum 90m, maximum 120m.
Width (goal line): Minimum 45m maximum 90m.

For senior football the recommended field dimension is 105m long and 68m wide.

Run-off area

The run-off area or buffer zone is 3m minimum. Where pitches are located alongside each other, a minimum of 6m is required. 

The run‑­off area beyond the pitch is free of any obstacle (including dugouts and floodlight columns) to ensure players and officials do not injure themselves by running into any fixed object.

The run‑­offs are surfaced with exactly the same surface as the playing area.

Goal area

Two lines are drawn at right angles to the goal line, 5.5m from the inside of each goalpost. These lines extend into the field of play for a distance of 5.5m and are joined by a line drawn parallel with the goal line. The area bounded by these lines and the goal line is the goal area.

Penalty area

Two lines are drawn at right angles to the goal line, 16.5m from the inside of each goalpost. These lines extend 16.5m into the field of play and are joined by a line drawn parallel with the goal line.

The area bounded by these lines and the goal line is the penalty area. Within each penalty area, a penalty mark is made 11m from the midpoint between the goalposts and equidistant to them.

An arc of a circle with a radius of 9.15m from the centre of each penalty mark is drawn outside the penalty area.

Flag posts

A flag post, not less than 1.5m high, with a non‑­pointed top and a flag is located at each corner.
Flag posts are also located at each end of the halfway line, not less than one metre outside the touch line.

A flag post, not less than 1.5m high, with a non‑­pointed top and a flag is located at each corner.

Goals

A goal is located on the centre of each goal line. A goal consists of two upright posts equidistant fromFootball---soccer-goals the corner flag posts and joined at the top by a horizontal crossbar. The goalposts and crossbar must be made of wood, metal or other approved material. They are square, rectangular, round or elliptical in shape and are not dangerous to players.

The distance between the posts is 7.320m and the distance from the lower edge of the crossbar to the ground is 2.44m.

Both goalposts and the crossbar have the same width and depth of 12cm. The goal lines have the same width as the goalposts and the crossbar. Goal nets are attached to the posts and ground behind the goals that conforms to the Australian Standard 4866.1—2007 Playing Field Equipment – Soccer Goals. The goalposts and crossbars are white. For safety reasons goals are anchored securely to the ground. 

Interchange zone

An interchange zone is marked for all competitions where unlimited interchange applies. The interchange zone may form part of the pitch marking or identified with cones. The interchange zone starts 1m either side of the touchline from the halfway line and extends 1m from the field of play.

Technical area

The technical area includes:
  • Two team benches, capable of seating nine people in each bench. 
  • Cover to protect the players and officials from the elements and missiles thrown by spectators. 
  • Identical fixtures for both teams.
  •  A table and chair for the 4th Official if required.

Soccer-pitch

Multi‑­pitch layouts

Many pitches operate alongside each other. It is important that there is a minimum of 6m clearance between pitches (3m run‑­off from each pitch). 

Soccer-multi-pitch-layout-for-juniors



Miniroos

Miniroos is a modified version of soccer for children aged 4‑­11 years. There are two programs, MiniRoos Kick‑­off which is the introductory program and Miniroos club football for children aged 5‑­11 who are ready to play in a team based environment. Both programs also have girls only teams.

Miniroos Club

Goals

Approved, safe portable goals must be used. Poles and markers cannot be used as goals. To comply with Australian Safety Standards, portable goals must be anchored securely to the ground. The use of sandbags or pegs is recommended when using pop‑­up style portable goals.

Markings

Field markings can be delivered by markers, traditional line marking, or a combination of both .
Under 6 and 7 years

Football-under-6-and-7

No of players 4 a side, no goalkeeper,
max 3 substitutes
Field of play 30m long x 20m wide
Goal size 2m wide x 1m high
Ball size Size 3
Duration 15 min halves,
min 5 min half time break
Penalty area None
Under 8 and 9 years
Football-under-8-and-9
No of players 7 a side, includinggoalkeeper
max 3 substitutes
Field of play Min: 40m long x 30m wide
Best practise: 45m long x 35m wide
Max: 50m long x 40m wide
Goal size 3m wide x 2m high
Ball size Size 3
Duration 20 min halves
Min 5 min half time break
Penalty area 5m deep x 12m wide
Under 10 and 11 years

Football-under 10 and 11

No of players 9 a side, including goalkeeper
max 5 substitutes
Field of play Min: 70m long x 50m wide
Best practise: 65m long x 45m wide
Max: 60m long x 40m wide
Goal size 5m wide x 2m high
Ball size Size 4
Duration 25 min halves
Min 5 min half time break
Penalty area 5m deep x 12m wide

Futsal

Futsal is the only form of indoor soccer or five‑­a‑­side that is officially approved by FIFA and Football Federation Australia (FFA).

Pitch surface

The surface is flat, smooth and non‑­abrasive, preferably made of wood or artificial material, according to the rules of the competition. Concrete or tarmac should be avoided.

Artificial turf pitches are permitted in exceptional cases and only for national competitions.

Pitch markings

The pitch is rectangular and marked with lines 8cm wide. The two longer lines are touch lines, the two shorter lines are goal lines. The touch line is longer than the goal line.
 
The pitch is divided in half by a halfway line, which joins the midpoints of the two touch lines. The centre mark is at the midpoint of the halfway line and is marked with a circle 3m in radius.
 
A mark 8cm wide is drawn outside the pitch, 5m from the corner arc and at right angles to the goal line, to ensure that defending players retreat this distance when a corner kick is being taken. 
 
Two marks, 8cm wide, each at a distance of 5m to the left and the right of the second penalty mark, are marked on the pitch to indicate the minimum distance to be retreated when a kick is being taken from the second penalty mark.

Dimensions

For non‑­international matches the dimensions are as follows:Futsal-pitch
  • Length (touch line): 
  • Minimum 25m maximum 42m.
  • Width (goal line): 
  • Minimum 16m maximum 25m.

For international matches the dimensions are as follows:

  • Length (touch line): Minimum 38m maximum 42m.
  • Width (goal line): Minimum 20m maximum 25m.

Penalty area

Two imaginary lines 6m long are drawn from the outside of each goalpost and at right angles to the goal line. At the end of these lines a quarter circle is drawn in the direction of the nearest touch line, each with a radius of 6m from the outside of the goalpost. The upper part of each quarter circle is joined by a line 3.16m long running parallel to the goal line between the goalposts. The area bounded by these lines and the goal line is the penalty area.

Within each penalty area, a penalty mark is made 6m from the midpoint between the goal posts and equidistant to them.

A second mark is made 10m from the midpoint between the goalposts and equidistant to them.

The corner arc

A quarter circle with a radius of 25cm from each corner is drawn inside the pitch.

Goals

A goal must be placed on the centre of each goal line. A goal consists of two upright posts equidistant from the corners and joined at the top by a horizontal crossbar. The goalposts and crossbar are made of wood, metal or other approved material. They are square, rectangular, round or elliptical in shape and are placed on the centre of each goal line.

The distance (inside measurement) between the posts is 3m and the distance from the lower edge of the crossbar to the ground is 2m.

Both goalposts and the crossbar have the same width and depth, 8cm. The nets are made of hemp, jute or nylon or other approved material and are attached to the back of the goalposts and the crossbar. The goalposts and crossbars are a different colour from the pitch.

The goals must have a stabilising system that prevents them from overturning. Portable goals are only used if they satisfy this requirement.

The substitution zones

The substitution zones are the areas on the touch line in front of the team benches and are 5m long. They are marked at each end with a line 80cm long, 40cm of which is drawn on the pitch and 40cm off the pitch, and 8cm wide.


References

FIFA Laws of the Game 2015. Fédération Internationale de Football Association, Zurich, Switzerland. www.fifa.com.au

AIA Vitality Mini Roos National Playing Formats and Rules. www.miniroos.com.au

Futsal Laws of the Game 2012/2013. FIFA, Zurich, Switzerland. www.fifa.com.au

Field Markings and Equipment. A guide to preparing your field for football. Football NSW November 2015. http://www.footballfacilities.com.au/field-markings-equipment/

Sport association details

Football West Limited

James Curtis
Chief Executive Officer
PO Box 214 Maylands WA 6051
Telephone 08 6181 0700
Email info@footballwest.com.au
Website www.footballwest.com.au
Twitter @FootballWest

Disclaimer

The information in this guide is general in nature and cannot be relied upon as professional advice concerning the design of, or marking out for, sporting facilities and playing areas. No assurance is given as to the accuracy of any information contained in this guide and readers should not rely on its accuracy. Readers should obtain their own independent and professional advice in relation to their proposed sporting activity.