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Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP) 2013 – 2018

This plan is available upon request in alternative formats such as large print, electronic format (disk or emailed, audio or Braille).

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Feedback form

Disability Access and Inclusion Plan feedback form

We invite you to provide feedback on the seven outcome areas of the Plan.

Contents

Introduction

Ongoing involvement in sport, recreation and physical activities is a positive part of all of our lives, to maintain health and well-being, create networks, provide social interaction and strengthen communities. The Department recognises the importance of sport and recreation participation for all people and is committed to providing services to the diverse Western Australian community, including people with disability, their families, carers and organisations.

The Department is working to ensure improved access and inclusion to quality services and facilities, access to information and how we consult and to respond to complaints relative to disability, access and inclusion.

The Department has adopted the Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP) 2013–18 to provide a basis for developing strategies and initiatives to assist people with disability and their families/carers in utilising the services and facilities of the Department.

Department of Sport and Recreation – what we do

"Sport and recreation builds stronger, healthier, happier and safer communities."

Our mission

To enhance the quality of life of Western Australians through their participation and achievement in sport and recreation.

Our purpose

  • Get more Western Australians physically active.
  • Resource and equip sport and recreation providers.
  • Support talent development and achievement in sport.
  • Promote sound infrastructure planning and sustainable facility provision.
  • Provide affordable recreation camp experiences.

Our key outcomes

  1. Industry development: A cohesive industry that provides a framework to optimise social, economic and health benefits of sport and recreation.
  2. Places and spaces: All Western Australians, regardless of the level at which they participate, their means or geographical location, have access to quality sport and active recreation facilities.
  3. Organisational development: Organisations that provide sport and active recreation services are effective, accountable, viable and responsive to their stakeholders and build capacity of sport and recreation personnel.
  4. Participation: A more physically active society in which sport and active recreation maintain and increase their contribution to community wellbeing.
  5. High performance: Excellence is achieved in sporting performance.
  6. Business management: A vibrant, responsive and progressive organisation that is accountable to government and the community.

Access and inclusion policy statement

The Department is committed to providing services to the diverse Western Australian community, including people with disability, their families, carers and organisations. We strive to continually improve access to services for all West Australians. 

Our commitment is demonstrated in our DAIP, which identifies a number of key strategies in addressing the needs of people with disability, under the following outcomes:

  1. People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to access the services of, and any events organised by, the Department.
  2. People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to access the buildings and other facilities of the Department.
  3. People with disability receive information from the Department in a format that will enable them to access the information as readily as other people are able to access it.
  4. People with disability receive the same level and quality of service from the staff of the Department as other people receive from the staff of the Department.
  5. People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to make complaints to the Department.
  6. People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to participate in any public consultation by the Department.
  7. People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to seek employment with the Department.

The Department recognises linkages between this Access and Inclusion Policy Statement and other key policy statements and projects, including:

Position statement: inclusivity (substantive equality)

The Department is committed to inclusive practices that encourage participation in physical activity of all people, regardless of their age, gender, cultural background, sexual orientation, disability, income and geographic location.

Fair Play: Strategic framework for inclusive sport and recreation

The Department recognises the social, physical and health benefits gained by people with disability through participation in sport and recreation.

The Department is committed to working towards a community in which all Western Australians can participate in physical activity, in a spirit of mutual respect, and experience the benefits of sport and recreation.

The Department of Sport and Recreation is committed to work under the guidance of the six values outlined in Fair Play (inclusion, accessibility, diversity, equity, dignity and respect) to increase and develop inclusive sport and recreation provision in local communities. 

Relevant legislation, codes and guidelines

People with disability, their families and carers have the same rights as other individuals to access services within the community. Under State and Commonwealth legislation, it is unlawful to discriminate against a person with a disability.

Disability Services Act 1993 (DSA)

The Disability Services Act 1993 (the Act) requires all State and Local Government authorities to implement a Disability Access and Inclusion Plan. The Disability Services Regulations Amendments (2004) dictate how the provisions of the Act are applied to Disability Access and Inclusion Plans, which include:

  • Standards for Disability Access and Inclusion Plans
  • Information in reports about Disability Access and Inclusion Plans
  • Publication of Disability Access and Inclusion Plans
  • Procedure for consultation by authorities.

Other legislation underpinning access and inclusion includes:

Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (DDA)

The DDA makes it unlawful to directly or indirectly discriminate or impose unjustifiable hardship against a person with any form of disability (i.e. physical, intellectual, sensory, psychiatric and neurological). Discrimination as defined by the DDA (1992) is documented as having a broad legislative application in:

  1. Work, accommodation, education, access to premises, clubs, sports
  2. The provision of goods, services, facilities and land
  3. The administration of Commonwealth laws and programs.

The DDA applies to public and private sectors and allows people to approach to Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission if they encounter discrimination.

It is the intention of the DDA to eliminate, as far as possible, discriminatory practices, but also to promote recognition and acceptance of the fundamental rights of people with disability.

The DDA covers a disability which a person has now, may have in the future, had in the past or is assumed to have. The DDA also makes it unlawful to discriminate against a person on the basis that their associate (partner, carer, friend, family member or business partner) has a disability.

The DDA covers existing premises, including heritage buildings, those under construction and future premises. The definition includes not only buildings, but also anything in the built environment such as car parks, sports fields, parks, pathways and transport systems, streetscapes and playgrounds.

Building Code of Australia (BCA)

The BCA references various Australian Standards and Codes to enable the achievement and maintenance of acceptable standards of structural sufficiency, safety (including safety from fire) health and amenity for the benefit of the community now and in the future.

Part D3 of the BCA (Vol 1) titled “Access for People with Disabilities” determines which types (Class) and parts of the buildings must comply with the access requirements currently referenced under the code.

Australian Standard (AS) 1428 – Design for Access and Mobility

AS 1428 (parts 1-4) is an important reference standard which prescribes the basic requirements for physical access for use in planning, development and construction of all buildings and facilities. Part 1 is a mandatory requirement, as referenced under the BCA.

The objective of the standard is to provide building designers and users (architects, property owners, regulators and such) with the minimum design requirements for new building work, to enable access for people with disability. The Australian Standard should also be used when providing improved or amended access to existing buildings and is usually used by professional access advisors as the basis for comprehensive access audits to identify access barriers across a wide range of premises.

Policy regarding agents and contractors

The Department of Sport and Recreation is committed to informing its agents and contractors of the DAIP and its outcomes, and to take all practicable measures to ensure the plan is implemented by such agents and contractors.

The Disability Services Act requires agents and contractors of public authorities to conduct their business in a manner consistent with the contracting public authority’s DAIP. Relevant sections of the Act include:

  • Section 28 Disability access and inclusion plans: (1) Each public authority must have a disability access and inclusion plan to ensure that in so far as its functions involve dealings with the general public, the performance of those functions furthers the principles in Schedule 1 and meets the objectives in Schedule 2. 
  • Section 29B Public authorities to ensure implementation of a disability access and inclusion plan: A public authority that has a disability access and inclusion plan must take all practicable measures to ensure that the plan is implemented by the public authority and its officers, employees, agents or contractors. 

The Department of Sport and Recreation will seek to ensure that its agents and contractors are sensitive to the needs of community members who have a disability. Requirements in regards to the Disability Access and Inclusion Plan:

  • Apply to new contracts.
  • Apply to contract variations.
  • Apply to services provided to the public.
  • Do not apply to services provided directly to the Department, e.g. building electrician, cleaners.

The Department will identify the DAIP in relevant tender and contract documents by including the following clause:

Disability Access and Inclusion Plan

If the contract involves the supply of services to the public, then the successful Respondent will:

  1. To the extent practicable, implement the Department’s “Disability Access and Inclusion Plan” prepared under the Disability Services Act 1993.
  2. Provide a report to the Department by (insert date) in each year of the contract term reporting on the extent to which the successful Respondent has implemented the Department’s Disability Access and Inclusion Plan.

(sourced from the Department of Treasury and Finance Request Document template)

The Department will provide a copy of the DAIP to the agent or contractor, if requested.

The Department of Sport and Recreation will include information in their yearly report to the Commission on how their agents and contractors were informed of the DAIP, and the progress their agents and contractors have made towards the desired outcomes of the DAIP.

Achievements under the 2009–2012 (extended to 2013) DAIP

This section briefly summarises some of the major achievements made by the Department of Sport and recreation through the implementation of the Disability Access and Inclusion Plan 2007–2012 (extended to 2013).

  1. People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to access the services of, and any events organised by, the Department.
    1. Organisational Sustainability Program – consultancy provided to disability-specific organisations our Department supports, including Wheelchair Sports WA, Inclusion WA and the Western Australian Disabled Sports Association.
    2. In 2011/12 when the Sports Connect role/program ceased (ASC funded), the Department continued work in this area through implementation of a broader inclusion officer role/support network.  The Sport’s Connect principles are embedded into the work of the Department’s inclusion team.  Inclusion officers – use a community development approach to work with low participation groups, that is, those that are not adequately resourced to enable them to achieve participation rates equal or close to those of the total population for example, Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CaLD), indigenous and people with disability. 
    3. Disability Sport and Recreation Forums were conducted quarterly with the provision of interpreters.
    4. Inclusive Sports Funding – four State Sporting Associations funded to implement strategies targeting people with disability.
    5. Development of a “train the trainer” package to increase the skill levels of fitness professionals in working with children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.
    6. Disability Review Implementation – As a result of the 2011 Review of the Disability Sport and Recreation Sector the Department developed the Disability Review Implementation Plan which was approved by the Minister for Sport and Recreation in late 2012. There are currently six strategy teams developing resources, reviewing strategic frameworks, and funding schemes in an effort to increase participation of people with disability in sport and recreation.
    7. Fair Play Strategy Group – Convened by DSR, this group includes representatives from selected agencies, including the DSC, Ethnic Disability Advocacy Council, WA Sports Federation, local government and other groups with interests in people with a disability PWD. The purpose of the group is to provide advice on the strategic approach and appropriate channels to achieve an increase in sport and active recreation for PWD. The group provided valuable input into the Department’s Disability Review as mentioned above.
    8. Community Participation Fund – 19% of approved CPF grants had a primary focus to increase participation of people with disability.
  2. People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to access the buildings and other facilities of the Department.
    1. Ensuring Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund application guidelines promote accessible facilities.
    2. Ensuring that State-level sport and recreation infrastructure is fully accessible. Ensuring that major sport and recreation infrastructure such as the new Perth Stadium is fully accessible.
    3. Our Department’s recreation camps continue to encourage and improve inclusive participation opportunities and site mobility through improved infrastructure, equipment provision and activity choice. Strategic operational foresight continues to proactively contribute to assisting deliver the Disability Access and Inclusion Plans objectives relative to camps. Examples include a recent upgrade to the dormitory bathrooms at the Bickley camp along with improved internal pathway networks and wheelchair accessible pathways and an accessible archery field at Woodman Point. Additionally, there continues to be progress in delivering improved processes that capture client needs to ensure inclusive participation, such as checklists and on-site preliminary planning. Cultural awareness training continues to ensure staff are supported professionally to deliver increased participation and responsive opportunities.
  3. People with disability receive information from the Department in a format that will enable them to access the information as readily as other people are able to access it.
    1. The Department has been proactive in addressing web accessibility requirements to the WCAG 2.0 A and AA standards in line with the State Government’s December 2013 milestone. This includes auditing websites for compliance, video captioning, providing alternative formats of documents, making necessary changes to HTML code and educational opportunities. The Department recognises ongoing commitment and resourcing is required to remain compliant and is currently exploring solutions to keep compliancy.
    2. The Department has consistently met requests for information in alternative formats, has advised staff of the requirement to meet such requests and provided interpreting services when required.
  4. People with disability receive the same level and quality of service from the staff of our Department as other people receive from the staff of our Department, can make complaints and can participate in any public consultation by our Department.
    1. Promoting the DAIP to staff, especially through our induction program, to ensure quality service and inclusion in consultation.
    2. Including disability organisations on our databases used to distribute news updates.
    3. Ongoing facilitation of interagency strategic and network groups (Fair Play) supporting people with a disability to engage in community sport and recreation.
    4. Provision of Disability Awareness Training to internal staff, regional staff and stakeholders groups e.g. regional sporting clubs.

Development of Disability Access and Inclusion Plan

The Department of Sport and Recreation is committed to undertaking public consultation when preparing, reviewing or amending the DAIP.

An internal review group (DAIP Reference Group) was established to oversee the 2007 – 12 plan review and the development of the 2013–18 DAIP. Following an internal scan across relevant organisational areas including Strategic Policy, Programs and Services and Facilities and Camps in relation to progress of the Department’s DAIP outcomes and strategies, and consideration of current and future priorities, a draft 2013–18 DAIP has been developed.

The draft DAIP was made available for public consultation via the Department’s website, notice of the consultation was provided through a Public Notice in the West Australian newspaper (print version), a broadcast email to key stakeholders including sport and recreation organisations, relevant peak governing bodies and local governments notifying that a draft DAIP was available for comment via the Department’s website and information was also placed on the Department’s intranet (available to staff).

Feedback provided will be utlised in the finalisation of the DAIP for submission to the Disability Services Commission following approval by the Department’s Corporate Executive. 

How we will monitor our progress in implementing the DAIP

Monitoring the DAIP

The Department’s DAIP Reference Group will meet as required to guide and monitor implementation of the DAIP as well as to oversee the review of the DAIP and fulfilment of the reporting requirements as prescribed by the Disability Services Act.

The initiatives developed to address the strategies outlined in the Department’s DAIP will be developed annually and incorporated into the Department’s annual operational and project plans across relevant organisational areas. Ongoing management of each of these initiatives will reside with the relevant program managers. Periodic reports will be coordinated through the Strategic Policy and Regional Services Division and submitted to the Department’s Corporate Executive as required.

Reporting on the DAIP

The Disability Services Act sets out the minimum reporting requirements for public authorities in relation to DAIPs.

DSR will report on the implementation of its DAIP through its Annual Report and the prescribed progress report template to the Disability Services Commission by 31 July each year, outlining:

  • Its progress towards the desired outcomes of its DAIP.
  • The progress of its agents and contractors towards meeting the six desired outcomes and the strategies used to inform its agents and contractors of its DAIP. 

Disability Access and Inclusion Plan 2013–2018

DSR has a detailed Implementation Plan that will be used to track specific actions against the following overarching strategies. The following proposed strategies will be incorporated in the Department’s existing program and service implementation plans and undertaken within the resource capability of the agency.

Outcome 1: Access to services

People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to access the services of, and any events organised by, the Department.

Access to services
Strategy
Timeframe
The DAIP Reference Group will guide and monitor implementation of the DAIP.     Ongoing
Raise employee awareness about specific requirements of the DAIP and Disability Services Act.     December 2013 and Ongoing
Raise contractors and agents of DSR awareness of the DAIP where services are being delivered.    
December 2013 and Ongoing
Continue to improve the procedures and outcomes monitoring in relation to funding grants.
Ongoing
Organise all events/forums so they are accessible to people with disability.   
December 2013 and Ongoing
Improve cross-government and community partnerships in the delivery of sport and recreation, and associated services.
Ongoing

 

Outcome 2: Access to buildings and facilities   

People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to access the buildings and other facilities of the Department.

Access to buildings and facilities
Proposed Strategy    Timeframe
Ensure that the influence of the Department in the sport and recreation industry is used to promote best practice for accessible buildings and facilities.
Ongoing
Continue to ensure that DSR buildings and facilities are accessible to people with disability.



 
Ongoing

Outcome 3: Access to information

People with disability receive information from the Department in a format that will enable them to access the information as readily as other people are able to access it.

Access to information
Proposed Strategy    Timeframe/priority
Ensure that DSR information including the DSR website, meets accessibility standards.
Ongoing
Ensure information is available in alternative formats suitable to people with disability on request.
Ongoing

Outcome 4: Equality in staff service

People with disability receive the same level and quality of service from the staff of the Department as other people receive from the staff of the Department.

Equality in staff service
Strategy    Timeframe
Distribute and promote the Department’s DAIP.
Ongoing
Ensure employees are adequately trained in relation to service and provision for people with disability.     Ongoing
Disability Awareness Training and promotion of the DAIP to be undertaken across the Department. Ongoing
Continue to identify opportunities for improvement around access and inclusion for people with disability. Ongoing

Outcome 5: Access to complaint mechanisms

People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to make complaints to the Department.

Access to complain
Strategy    Timeframe
Ensure DSR’s complaints management system and processes are accessible to people with disability. Dec 2013 and Ongoing

Outcome 6: Participation in consultation

People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to participate in any public consultation by the Department.

Participation in consultation
Strategy    Timeframe
Ensure appropriate protocols to support community consultation are established and implemented to ensure accessibility for people with disability.
Ongoing

Outcome 7: Access to employment

People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to seek employment with the Department.

Access to enployment
Strategy Timeframe
Ensure recruitment policies and practices are inclusive.
Ongoing
Develop strategies to improve attraction, recruitment and retention of employees with disability. Ongoing
Ensure DSR staff with disability are supported to undertake their employment responsibilities. Ongoing

Contact

If you would like to comment on our Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP), please use the feedback form provided or alternatively contact us by one of the following methods:

For general inclusion enquiries please contact

nullSusan McDonald
nullPlanning and Assessing Officer
null246 Vincent Street, LEEDERVILLE WA 6007
nullPO Box 329, LEEDERVILLE WA 6903
null08 9492 9821
nullEmail Susan

Inclusion Officers

nullJonelle Burns/Natasha Hanham
nullInclusion Officer
nullNorth, Central Metro (Coastal) and Regional Support
null246 Vincent Street, LEEDERVILLE WA 6007
nullPO Box 329, LEEDERVILLE WA 6903
nullTelephone 08 9492 9814
nullFacsimile 08 9492 9711
nullEmail Jonelle
nullEmail Natasha

nullGemma Whitman
nullInclusion Officer
nullSouth Metro, South East Metro & Regional Support
null246 Vincent Street, LEEDERVILLE WA 6007
nullPO Box 329, LEEDERVILLE WA 6903
nullTelephone 08 9492 9620
nullFacsimile 08 9492 9711
nullEmail Gemma

Melanie Thomas
Inclusion Officer
East, Central Metro and regional Support
246 Vincent Street, LEEDERVILLE WA 6007
PO Box 329, LEEDERVILLE WA 6903
Telephone 08 9492 9741
Facsimile 08 9492 9711
Email Melanie

Review of the disability access and inclusion plan

Disability Review Implementation Plan

The department has established strategy teams to progress the approved Implementation Plan, would you like to be involved?

Disability in Western Australia 

A disability is a continuing condition that restricts everyday activities, and can affect a person's capacity to communicate, interact with others, learn, and get about independently. A disability is usually permanent but may be episodic, and can be hidden (e.g. epilepsy) or visible (e.g. cerebral palsy). The condition may be attributed to a sensory, neurological, physical, intellectual, cognitive, or psychiatric impairment, or a combination of these.

Disability affects one-third of the Western Australian population. An estimated 20.6% have a disability (5.8% have profound or severe core activity limitation) and 12.6% are carers for people with disabilities. More than one in every three carers has a disability. Over the next 20 years, the number of Western Australians with a disability is expected to increase as a result of population increase and the population ageing.

Background to Disability Access and Inclusion Plans (DAIPs)

As members of the community, people with disabilities, their families and carers have the same rights as other people to access all information, services and facilities provided by the Department of Sport and Recreation. These rights are built into State and Commonwealth legislation, which makes it unlawful to discriminate against a person with a disability.

In 2001, the department implemented its Disability Services Plan for the period 2001-2006. This plan was to built upon previous progress made by the organisation, and provided a basis for developing further strategies and initiatives to assist people with disabilities in utilising the services and facilities of the department.

To meet compliance requirements under the Disability Services Act 1993 (as amended 2004), the department has developed this new Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP), to be implemented over the years 2007-2012. The DAIP will outline the ways in which the department will ensure that people with disabilities have equal access to its facilities and services.

 
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