Strategic Directions 5 (SD5)

The sport and recreation industry's dynamic five-year plans help deliver successful outcomes for sport and recreation in WA. 

WA’s sport and recreation industry has been guided by three to five-year strategic directions since 1997, providing industry a framework in which to operate and develop. It has also guided State Government decision-making and funding directions and has brought about a range of industry outcomes.

Western Australian Sport and Recreation Industry Strategic Direction 2011-2015 (SD5) is the fifth set of strategic directions, or key challenges, for the sector.

We are continually faced with a series of great opportunities brilliantly disguised as insoluble problems.

John Gardner, Former US Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare

The need for strategic direction

Success is often measured by achieving goals and the sport and recreation industry is no different.

Government has an important leadership role in promoting an active and healthy society. The Department has a key role to play to ensure that the sport and recreation sector in Western Australia remains responsive to the community.

Strategic Directions provides direction and promotes the sport and recreation industry as a vital contributor to the lifestyles of Western Australians, from physical, health and social perspectives, at the individual, community and business level.

Message from the Minister

Sport and recreation is about more than winning. It is a vehicle to bring the community together and provide people with opportunities for positive interactions with one another. It fosters good physical and mental health in our young and can play an important role in creating the places and events for people to get together. This is why the job that this industry does is so important.

The State Government recognises Strategic Directions 5 as a pivotal sport and recreation industry planning framework. This document sets out some of the key strategic issues facing Western Australia and their subsequent challenges for the sport and recreation industry.

I would encourage you to firstly study this document in detail and then work on ways to utilise this information in your own strategic planning processes. I would also encourage you to think ‘big picture’ and to work with other organisations and agencies to address these challenges as a collective. This will not only benefit our industry, but will ultimately benefit our community in the long-term. I congratulate the industry on the work done so far in creating this framework.

Thank you for the work you currently do and for the work you will do in the future.

Hon Terry Waldron MLA, Minister for Sport and Recreation

Message from the Chair

Never before has active participation in sporting and recreational activity been more important to the health and wellbeing of all Western Australians and most importantly, in building safer and more engaged communities. It could also be said that the task of ensuring active participation has never been more challenging.

If all those involved in the sport and recreation industry are to make a meaningful contribution to building the healthy, engaged and strong communities that we aspire to live in, it is fundamental that we actively plan to do so. Sport and recreation must be positioned as an essential element or building block of a safe, healthy and happy community.

Strategic Directions 5 is a document developed by industry leaders in consultation with a broad group of stakeholders and most importantly members of the broader community. It seeks to identify the challenges that must be met, and the elements that should be considered, by sport and recreation organisations as they develop their plans for the future.

SD5 identifies some very significant challenges which require careful and considered responses. It is a call for action, for all to work together to ensure that active involvement in sport and recreation is not considered a luxury but essential to building a safe, healthy and happy community.

I commend SD5 to all who have a role to play - in the industry and broader community - in ensuring that sport and recreation takes its rightful place in our community and that all have the opportunity to be actively engaged in sport and recreation.

John Atkins Chair, Strategic Directions 5 Reference Group

SD5 Intent

SD5 has been developed to:

  • Provide vision and direction for WA’s sport and recreation industry.
  • Increase stakeholder understanding of emerging issues.
  • Guide strategic planning processes for organisations.
  • Better inform governments of stakeholder aspirations.

Consultation

An extensive consultation process was undertaken with people from within the industry and external stakeholders. Consultation methods included:

  • Evaluation of Strategic Directions 4 (SD4) 2006–2010.
  • Environmental scan of strategic planning and strategic outlook sources at regional, national and jurisdictional levels.
  • SD5 consultation forum at the Active 10 sport and recreation industry conference.
  • Structured interviews and discussion roundtables with state government agencies.
  • Industry peak body interviews.
  • Group discussions with state sporting associations.
  • Public submissions.
  • SD5 discussion paper and online survey.

Timeframe

SD5 covers a five-year time period to allow analysis of the issues and time for stakeholder groups to develop responses. It will be reviewed regularly to monitor progress towards the desired outcome and adjust directions where necessary.


SD5 Framework

Overarching principles

  • Innovation
  • Inclusivity
  • Accessibility and affordability
  • Excellence
  • Cooperative partnerships and relationships
  • Statewide service delivery
  • Sustainability.

Drivers of change

  • Ageing population
  • Time pressures
  • Wellbeing and obesity
  • Environment
  • Volunteers and professionals
  • Sustainability agenda
  • Economic outlook
  • Increased regional investment
  • Technology

Settings for change

  • Community
  • Schools
  • Workplaces
  • Households

Strategic areas for change

  • Participation
  • People development
  • Industry development
  • Organisational development
  • Places and spaces
  • High performance

Mechanisms for change

  • Advocacy and marketing
  • Training and development
  • Collaboration and innovation
  • Strategic planning
  • Research and evidence

Summary of key challenges

For the sport and recreation industry in Western Australia (the Industry) to make improvements in key strategic areas for change, the following challenges must be addressed over the next five years.

Participation

  1. The current affordability barrier that is preventing many young people from low socio-economic families participating in sport and recreation must be overcome.
  2. Continual adaptation and innovation of programs and services must occur to:
    1. Deliver more diverse participation options (e.g. new environments, scheduling variations, sport product variations and new pursuits).
    2. Be more inclusive of low participation and new populations (e.g. migrants, indigenous populations, people with a mental illness, seniors, isolated populations, people with a disability).
  3. The Industry must:
    1. Better influence the early childhood agenda to ensure that the importance of play and development of fundamental movement skills are embedded as a core component of early childhood development and learning.
    2. Ensure that models and products for early years participation in sport and recreation are based on principles of play and generic fundamental movement skills.
  4. The Industry, along with health, education, transport and planning, must proactively contribute to the collaborative endeavour to ensure more Western Australians are more active more often.

People development

  1. The industry must bolster its attraction and retention strategies to ensure competitiveness in a projected tight labour market.
  2. Innovative solutions and models are required to:
    1. Enable productivity gains for time poor volunteers
    2. Engage young people in volunteering.
  3. A strengthened and ongoing commitment to workforce training and professional development is required to underpin the Industry’s long-term sustainability. This extends to initiatives that:
    1. Strengthen the skills, efficiency and knowledge of employees/contractors.
    2. Bolster executive and board governance capability.

Industry development

  1. Industry leaders must enhance the advocacy effort for the value-add that sport and recreation delivers for mainstream public policy (specifically community development, health, education, environment and justice).
  2. The Industry must continue to make a proactive contribution to contentious issues that threaten its positive image and brand on two fronts:
    1. Business and commercial partnerships (e.g. alcohol, betting, fast food)
    2. Responsiveness to existing and emerging social issues (e.g. drugs, alcohol, social inclusion, racial vilification).
  3. The Industry must further develop links to the Indian Ocean Rim whilst retaining traditional bonds within the national network.

Organisational development

  1. Greater focus is needed on sport and recreation organisations evolving relevant and robust business models that enable:
    1. Sustainable operational and financial viability.
    2. Responsiveness to changing markets and contexts (e.g. commercialisation, industrial awards, structure of sport system, unitary modelling, changing participant markets).
    3. Efficient application of new technology and business systems.
  2. Concerted efforts are required to manage or reduce the regulatory and compliance burden on the Industry, especially those that impact on the 200,000 volunteers within the Industry.
  3. Partnerships must be formed to assist the Industry to interpret implications and to develop responses to key strategic externalities (e.g. tax reform, multiple COAG agendas, introduction, water shortages, climate change).

Places and Spaces

  1. Affordable and sustainable provision models must be applied to manage the long-term impacts of the strong investment in sport and recreation infrastructure and spaces in regional WA and new planning frameworks at the local government (e.g. community planning – infrastructure and services, land use planning, asset plans), regional and broader urban planning levels.
  2. Fundamental shortcomings in open space quantity, quality and functionality must be urgently resolved. Specific approaches will be required to address the needs in:
    1. Inner metropolitan
    2. Outer metropolitan
    3. Regional and remote Western Australia.
  3. Integrated policy and partnership approaches are required to ensure natural environments are well-managed and accessible for recreational pursuits (e.g. recreation access to water catchments, public access to recreational land).
  4. The Industry must actively engage to ensure sport and recreation interests are integrated within existing and new planning frameworks at the local government, regional and broader urban planning levels. 

High Performance

  1. Western Australia must optimise support for our elite and talented athletes within a newly operationalised federal and state intergovernmental partnership (National Institutes System Intergovernmental Agreement).
  2. Robust policy scrutiny must be applied to the sustainability of national league teams and competitions in order to manage the implications on athlete pathways, sport profiles and effective use of resources.
  3. Partnerships must be secured to build a compelling sport and recreation events calendar that delivers benefits for the community, tourism, sport and State development.

Activating SD5

SD5 is a dynamic framework. Issues and challenges will continue to evolve over the lifetime of the framework.

Meeting these challenges will require a collaborative effort across the Industry. As a call to action, the Industry must commit time and energy to progress these challenges.

The series of commitments proposed below are key to activating SD5 over the next five years:

  1. The Industry must be an advocate for the SD5 challenges and take collective action to influence government policies, action and investment.
  2. The Department of Sport and Recreation must lead and facilitate the activation of SD5, including:
    • Convening stakeholder groups to address Key Challenges.
    • Leading a collaborative approach across government in addressing challenges with cross–portfolio implications.
    • Development of appropriate performance indicators to measure success in meeting the Key Challenges identified in SD5.
    • Assisting organisations to meet the identified Key Challenges.
    • Communicating to the Industry, governments and the broader community progress towards meeting the Key Challenges.
    • Coordinating regular reviews of the SD5 framework and challenges, as well as a major review of SD5 at its completion.
  3. Each region should interpret, prioritise and respond to the challenges presented in SD5.
  4. Each industry sector and organisation should use the challenges presented in SD5 to guide their own strategic planning and direction.
  5. Every coach, official, volunteer, parent, participant and administrator should contribute at a grassroots level to progress the SD5 challenges.

Sport and Recreation Industry Structure in Western Australia

Community

  • Players
  • Coaches
  • Instructors
  • Athletes
  • Participants
  • Officials
  • Volunteers
  • Administrators
  • Spectators
  • Families
  • Citizens

Service providers

  • Clubs
  • Local government
  • Facility managers
  • Commercial providers
  • Camps
  • Training organisations
  • Not-for-profits
  • Community groups
  • Schools
  • Universities and TAFEs

Peak governing and umbrella bodies

  • Sport federations
  • State Sporting Associations
  • Regional Sporting Associations
  • National sporting organisations
  • Olympic, Commonwealth Games and Paralympic committees
  • Recreation bodies
  • Community not-for-profit organisations
  • Australian Council for Health
  • Sports Medicine Australia

Core Federal and State government bodies

  • Australian Sports Commission
  • Department for Prime Minister and Cabinet
  • State departments of sport/recreation
  • Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority
  • State institutes and academies of sport
  • Australian Institute of Sport

Wider stakeholders

  • Community organisations
  • Other government agencies
  • Media
  • Corporate/business
  • International organisations

Evolution of Strategic Directions Process

Since the inception of the Strategic Directions process in 1997, a number of significant industry outcomes have been achieved. The diagram below summarises some of these outcomes and depicts the evolution of the industry over this timeframe.

Strategic Directions 1997–1999

  • Development of the Premier’s Physical Activity Taskforce.
  • Adoption of contemporary business management practices by sport and recreation service providers.
  • Recognition of the industry’s contribution to society in terms of broader community wellbeing.
  • Joint provision and shared use of facilities.

Strategic Directions 2 1999–2002

  • Addressing the declining levels of participation in physical activity.
  • Improved strategic planning in sport and recreation organisations.
  • Development of the State Sporting Facilities Plan Future Success, a strategic plan for high performance sport in WA.

Strategic Directions 3 2003–2005

  • Improved advocacy of the value of sport and recreation.
  • Increased inclusiveness.
  • Improved volunteer and club management, particularly through effective partnerships between local
  • government and community organisations.
  • Development of risk management practices and solutions to public liability issues.
  • Industry responses to sustainability.

Strategic Directions 4 2006–2010

  • Development of strategic partnerships to consolidate industry status in areas such as water planning, Statewide facility planning and regional development.
  • Enhanced local service delivery through the establishment of Club Development Officer positions in local government.
  • Adoption of an inclusive approach to sport and recreation delivery and capacity building.
  • Broadening of funding programs in regional areas.

SD5 Key Strategic Areas for Change – Findings and Challenges

Participation

Moving sport and recreation into the 21st century – inclusion and innovation

For a significant proportion of the community with limited means, cost is a major barrier preventing involvement in club-based sport and recreation activities.1

Enabling participation from the sectors of community most likely to be excluded is central to the capacity of sport and recreation to make a broader contribution to social policy and community wellbeing. The power of the sport and recreation setting to provide supportive and positive engagement with young people, especially those at risk, should be leveraged.2

Challenge 1

The current affordability barrier that is preventing many young people from low socio-economic families participating in sport and recreation must be overcome.

Sport and recreation is not immune to changing lifestyles – modern communities are time poor, technologically savvy, have longer working hours, and are increasingly sedentary and indoor-oriented.3 Also increasing are community demands for sport and recreation services and programs that deliver a spectrum of experiences.

There remains significant untapped potential to connect with emerging participant markets through recreational activity, extreme sports, adventure pursuits and technology adaptations. It is critical for the Industry to continually embrace, evolve and respond to this menu of changing lifestyles and markets.

Approaches to participation in community life are increasingly oriented toward an inclusion philosophy. This is propelling demands for both government and community policy and service delivery to better cater for the diversity within our community.4 The Industry must encourage and support strategic approaches in targeted populations to raise participation levels towards national averages.

Challenge 2

Continual adaptation and innovation of programs and services must occur to:

  • Deliver more diverse participation options (e.g. new environments, scheduling variations, sport product variations, new pursuits)
  • Be more inclusive of low participation and new populations (e.g. migrants, indigenous populations, seniors, people with a mental illness, isolated populations and people with disability).

Giving kids a head start

The lifestyle pursuits of children and families today are dominated by screens, technology and the indoors. There are increasing pressures for schools, the education system, childcare providers and parents to respond to demands for better literacy, numeracy and academic outcomes. In this new focus, there is an inherent risk that the focus on developing fundamental movement skills and providing opportunities for play will be diminished.

New modes for education through independent schools are providing more flexibility and opportunities for local communities and schools to make choices about learning. It is critical that key institutions intersecting childhood – schools, family, sport and recreation and childcare - work together to reinstate the value of play as a childhood development necessity.

The social, cognitive, learning and health risks of a generation of nature-deprived, indoor and non-participative children are becoming increasingly concerning. The growing focus on unhealthy lifestyles, obesity, mental illness, isolation and antisocial behaviour of children and young people has created an opportunity for the sector to seek new partnerships that utilise the power of the sport and recreation setting to address these issues.6

The industry must embrace the pathway that play provides for early and lifelong participation in sport and recreation.

It is critical that the sector is proactive and vocal in ensuring that opportunities for skills development and play are advanced in education, childcare and family settings.

Challenge 3

The Industry must:

  • Better influence the early childhood agenda to ensure the importance of play and development of fundamental movement skills are embedded as a core component of early childhood development and learning.
  • Ensure that models and products for early years participation in sport and recreation are based on principles of play and generic fundamental movement skills.

Physical activity

The implications of obesity, physical inactivity and sedentary lifestyles continue to escalate and breed immense long-term health, social and economic costs. Despite continued endeavours in policy and program coordination, physical activity and obesity remains a critical and complex priority issue for the State.7 The Industry is continuing the call for new and radical efforts in the way the obesity epidemic is confronted.

A significant effort is required to escalate the political will and investment applied to the prevention and particularly physical activity agenda. It remains critical for the industry to sustain and strengthen its contribution to a collaborative physical activity policy, program and investment effort.

Challenge 4

The Industry, along with health, education, transport and planning, must proactively contribute to the collaborative endeavour to ensure more Western Australians are more active more often.

People Development

Competitive labour market

The medium-term labour outlook for Western Australia predicts a shortfall of 400,000 workers8. The demand for employment opportunities in those sectors directly associated with the sustained long-term economic growth in Western Australia is forecast to place more pressure on industries outside of this realm to be competitive in the labour market. This scenario will be especially pertinent in regional Western Australia.

It is critical the industry is committed to real and significant changes to key competition levers for the paid workforce such as remuneration levels, work arrangements, recognition and industrial coverage. The industry must also look outside traditional parameters for innovative and partnership-based planning solutions to workforce attraction and retention.

These considerations must be integrated into long-term, robust workforce planning frameworks across the Industry to ensure a sufficient and qualified workforce into the future.

Challenge 1

The industry must bolster its attraction and retention strategies to ensure competitiveness in a projected tight labour market.

Volunteers

Volunteers are the cornerstone of Western Australian culture and form the backbone of sport and recreation delivery in local communities. The need for creating a stable and competent volunteer workforce is common across the community sector. The imperative for action in the sport and recreation setting is critical given the workforce ratio is approximately one paid employee for every 100 volunteers, with a volunteer annual turnover of one in three within the State Sporting Association structure alone.9

A radical and innovative shift in thinking and mode of operation is required to reduce the volunteer age gap and engage the next generation of volunteers. The industry needs to reorient approaches and frameworks for volunteer attraction, recognition, reward and training to connect with and make it easier for young people to become and remain a community sport and recreation volunteer.10

Technology is the communication and business development tool of the 21st century that has fundamentally shifted the way business and communication is conducted. It is critical industry to embrace new technology and business models that will enable quantum productivity leaps for volunteers in this State.

Challenge 2

Innovative solutions and models are required to:

  • Enable productivity gains for time poor volunteers
  • Engage young people in volunteering.

Workforce capacity

Workforce development is critical to ensuring that the sport and recreation workforce is adequately prepared to meet the availability and service delivery challenges presented in the medium to long-term.11

Best practice models for workforce planning must focus on strengthening the governance and executive capability of sport and recreation organisations. This focus must be underpinned by expanded access to training and professional development which supports improved quality and efficiency of service delivery.

A renewed commitment to training, professional development and workforce planning across all layers of paid and unpaid personnel within the system is critical to the sector’s long-term viability and sustainability.

Challenge 3

A strengthened and ongoing commitment to workforce training and professional development is required to underpin the industry’s long-term sustainability. This extends to initiatives that:

  • Strengthen the skills, efficiency and knowledge of employees/contractors.
  • Bolster executive and board governance capability.

Industry Development

Value-add to broader agendas – Selling the social value of sport and recreation

Considerable effort has been applied to consolidate the evidence base of the value of sport and recreation in ‘binding’ communities and adding significant value to key social policy agendas.11 In parallel, theiIndustry has also deliberately focused energy and delivered outcomes in demonstrating sport and recreation’s contribution to broader social policy outcomes (e.g. inclusion of new communities and alternatives to antisocial behaviour).12

Despite progress, sport and recreation continues to underplay its role and contribution to social fabric, individual resilience, social connection and public policy in key areas such as health, community development, justice, education, environment and tourism.

Focus is required to unify the industry’s advocacy and lobbying efforts in key political and community domains to achieve investment and policy shifts in favour of the industry. The industry, at all levels, needs to apply more cohesive rigour, evidence and political influence in the larger and more compelling policy areas such as health, education, environment and law and order.

Challenge 1

Industry leaders must enhance the advocacy effort for the value-add that sport and recreation delivers for mainstream public policy (specifically community development, health, education, environment and justice).

The image of sport and recreation

The Industry is not immune to a need to confront and respond to modern social issues such as excessive consumption of alcohol, illicit drug use, antisocial behaviour and child protection from grass roots through to elite level. Sport and recreation clubs, players, participants and coaches have demonstrated leadership in creating momentum for change on significant social issues such as the racial vilification, child protection and tobacco sponsorship agendas in the 1990s.

The industry needs to make a concerted and unified effort to better manage the manifestations of these social issues that occur within or threaten the sport and recreation setting. Modern sport and recreation clubs, organisations, teams and franchises must increasingly consider the financial, social and cultural implications of their business decisions about commercial alliances, sponsorships and operations. Furthermore, the industry must capitalise on its powerful community standing and proactively demonstrate its leadership contribution to community change and action in these areas.

It is critical for the longevity of sport and recreation participation and competitiveness, locally and nationally, that the community, commercial partners, government decision makers and politicians have confidence in the sport and recreation setting.

Challenge 2

Sport and recreation must continue to make a proactive contribution to contentious issues that threaten its positive image and brand on two fronts:

  • Business and commercial partnerships (e.g. alcohol, betting, fast food).
  • Responsiveness to existing and emerging social issues (e.g. drugs, alcohol, social inclusion, racial vilification).

Strengthening links in the Indian Ocean Rim – particularly Asia

Western Australia’s location within the Indian Ocean Rim is generating a new momentum for the State to strengthen its links and alliances with nations of the region as well as the traditional east coast networks. The Industry can play a pivotal role in strengthening this partnership for sport and recreation outcomes as well as broader contribution to tourism, trade, commerce and state development objectives.

The Industry must continue to pursue opportunities for partnerships and formal links in the Indian Ocean Rim with a particular focus on Asia in areas such as: exchange of sport and recreation expertise (e.g. sport education; facilities design, planning, construction and management, high performance athlete program management, water safety, enhancing opportunities for the tertiary sector, coaching and officiating; athlete development; and events).

Challenge 3

Western Australian sport and recreation must further develop linkages in the Indian Ocean Rim, particularly Asia, whilst retaining traditional bonds within the national network.

Organisational Development

Evolving business models

There is an expectation for modern organisations to have a sophisticated information communication technology capacity; diverse and viable revenue streams; contemporary management practices; multi-faceted governance and decision making standards; strong member relationships and high level transparency and accountability.

This presents a myriad of evolving business development complexities for organisations in the sport and recreation sector that are often poorly resourced and heavily reliant on an unpaid workforce.

There is a need to elevate business planning and performance of organisations in the sport and recreation sector to a new level.

Challenge 1

Greater focus is needed on sport and recreation organisations evolving relevant and robust business models that enable:

  • sustainable operational and financial viability;
  • responsiveness to changing markets and contexts (e.g. commercialisation, industrial awards, structure of sport system, unitary modelling, changing participant markets); and
  • efficient application of new technology and business systems.

Reducing the regulatory burden

The current regulatory, compliance and risk management environment is a product of good intent to meet community expectations for accountability and safety. The by-product of this environment translates to a plethora of additional community and sport and recreation specific compliance and regulatory requirements that the Industry has to meet.

Administrators must now deal with workload and process pressures generated from child protection, risk management, liquor licensing, GST, financial management and insurance (e.g. Adventure Activity Standards, Working with Children Checks, Occupational Health and Safety laws, excursion policy, grant application and acquittal processes).

Broadly speaking, the Industry has adapted and delivers effective outcomes on compliance and risk management fronts. However, the aggregate impact of this myriad of compliance and regulatory obligation falls mainly on administrators who are mostly overloaded volunteers.

The Industry must pursue the reduction of the regulatory burden and as a minimum ensure that the associated processes and workloads are less intrusive and less onerous on day-to-day administrators and volunteers.

Challenge 2

Concerted efforts are required to manage or reduce the regulatory and compliance burden on the Industry, especially those that impact on the 200,000 volunteers within the Industry.

Externalities

The Industry is meeting policy, program and service delivery challenges in a broader context of current and future political, economic, social and environmental issues. A menu of externalities such as climate change, federal occupational health and safety legislation, a carbon tax and water management have unavoidable flow on implications for the Industry.

A rising awareness of the connection between externalities and sport and recreation is generating heightened demand for leadership in supporting the Industry to understand the issues, interpret implications and devise responses and activity adaptations.

Government, peak industry and advocacy bodies must be responsive and show leadership in this endeavour.

Challenge 3

Partnerships must be formed to assist the Industry to interpret implications and to develop responses to key strategic externalities (e.g. tax reform, multiple COAG agendas, carbon tax introduction, water shortages, climate change).

Places and Spaces

Sustainable regional infrastructure investment

The current and medium-term outlook is for sustained investment by government and the private sector in regional sport and recreation infrastructure in Western Australia.13 Royalties for Regions, Regional Development Australia Funds and mining developments in the north-west and mid-west present multiple channels and mechanisms available to deliver a sport and recreation infrastructure legacy.

Over the past five years there has been a strong momentum for the value of life cycle maintenance costing and whole of life asset planning.

It is critical that these learnings from practice devised and implemented over recent times are rigorously applied to the next investment phase to ensure that the recurrent impost on regional communities is affordable and sustainable.

Challenge 1

Affordable and sustainable provision models must be applied to manage the long-term impacts of the strong investment in sport and recreation infrastructure and spaces in regional WA.

Open space

Compelling data exists that demonstrates shortfalls in the quality, quantity, functionality and accessibility of open spaces.14 Open spaces such as parks, ovals and waterways are the natural environments that facilitate sport and recreation.

Growth and urban consolidation targets contained within macro urban planning strategies such as Directions 2031 coupled with land shortages will place further pressures on open space provision and adequacy. The anticipated population growth will increasingly impact on access to spaces with competing functions, such as water catchments.15

The Industry must urgently influence Western Australia’s key state planning mechanisms to trigger a significant shift in current policy, planning and resourcing approaches that apply to metropolitan, outer metropolitan, regional and remote Western Australia. Region plans are just one example of a mechanism for identifying land that has important recreational value.

Failure to address the current disparity in open space will result in profound generational social, health, economic, justice and environmental and lifestyle implications.

Challenge 2

Fundamental shortcomings in open space quantity, quality and functionality must be urgently resolved. Specific approaches will be required to address the needs in:

  • inner metropolitan;
  • outer metropolitan; and
  • regional and remote Western Australia.

Challenge 3

Integrated policy and partnership approaches are required to ensure natural environments are well managed and accessible for recreational pursuits (e.g. recreation access to water catchments, public access to recreational land).

Remaining at the forefront of the local planning agenda

Traditional planning frameworks at the local government level (land use planning and asset planning) continue to provide challenges for integrating sport and recreation planning priorities. A new wave of planning undertakings triggered by the review of the Local Government Act and revised planning strategies have elevated expectations of local government to undertake strategic planning for the provision of community infrastructure and services (e.g. community infrastructure planning, strategic community planning).

Despite recent strengthening of policy and localised partnerships in the planning domain, further headway still needs to be made in ensuring sport and recreation priorities are considered in land use, community and urban planning deliberations.16 There is a need for the Industry to be proactive and compelling in engaging and partnering local government in these undertakings.

Achieving a stronghold in front end, localised planning is the most efficient mechanism for the Industry to ensure that provision, quality and activation of places and spaces for sport and recreation are at the forefront of future land use planning and management decisions.

Challenge 4

The Industry must actively engage to ensure sport and recreation interests are integrated within existing and new planning frameworks at the local government (e.g. community planning – infrastructure and services, land use planning, asset plans), regional and broader urban planning levels.

High Performance

Stewardship of high performance sport

Post the Crawford report17 there have been ongoing negotiations to develop an agreement between federal and state and territory governments to enhance alignment of Australia’s high performance sport institutes and academies to national sport plans. Western Australia’s participation in these arrangements is to enable, in the main, our talented and elite athletes to optimise their talent from a local daily training environment. The recently finalised National Institutes of Sport Intergovernmental Agreement (NISIA) between the Commonwealth and states/territories will impact on the elite sport landscape over the medium-term.

Western Australia must ensure our talented and elite athletes have access to training and competition opportunities that will optimise their pursuit of sporting excellence and the achievement of long-term career and life goals.

Challenge 1

Western Australia must optimise support for our elite and talented athletes within a newly operationalised federal and state intergovernmental partnership (National Institutes System Intergovernmental Agreement).

National leagues

Western Australia currently fields 23 teams in national league competitions in an array of sports. These teams vary in terms of sustainability, competitiveness, strategic direction and branding. They provide profile for sports and important pathways for athletes, coaches and officials. They are also resource intensive.

At both the team level and broader national league level there are underlying business and sustainability issues without strong reliance on government subsidies, benefactors or underwriting by participating athletes.

Challenge 2

Robust policy scrutiny must be applied to the sustainability of national league teams and competitions in order to manage the implications on athlete pathways, sport profiles and effective use of resources.

Grow, retain and develop sport and recreation events

Western Australia’s events calendar has softened markedly since the heady period in the late 1990s (WA hosted 10 world championship events in 1998).

Globally the sports event hosting landscape has been especially competitive. At the same time budget limitations within the tourism portfolio have constrained their ability to attract additional major sporting events.

There is no consistent approach to capacity building, investment or system support for developing locally grown events across the sport and recreation market.

Locally, sporting interests have not had direct participation in the strategic direction setting for development of the state’s sport calendar.

Challenge 3

Partnerships must be secured to build a compelling sport and recreation events calendar that delivers benefits for the community, tourism, sport and state development.

Appendix A: Big Picture in Western Australia

Since Strategic Directions 4, Western Australian society has undergone numerous changes which impact on the way the Industry will operate into the future. It is crucial to understand the current context in order to guide the future directions and be prepared for future challenges and opportunities in our industry.

Snapshot of participation in sport and recreation

A snapshot of some of the key strategic influences in Western Australia today and into the future.

  • In 2009, the rate for overall participation in organised physical activity in Western Australia was 39.6%. This was slightly lower than the national average of 39.8%.18
  • Around one in five Western Australians swim, one in eight cycles, and one in 10 runs.19
  • Walking (other), aerobics/fitness, swimming, cycling, running and golf are the consistent top six sports for Western Australians in 2008 and 2009.20
  • In 2008, 3.71 million Australians (17.5%) were estimated to be obese – 1.76 million males (16.5% of all males) and 1.95 million females (18.5% of all females).21
  • In 2008, almost three-quarters (74%) of indigenous children aged 4–14 years were physically active for at least 60 minutes every day in the week prior to interview. A further 12% were active for at least 60 minutes on four to six days in the week prior to interview. Very few children (3%) did no physical activity in the week prior to interview.22
  • Children and adolescents with a disability participate in less physical activity than children and adolescents without a disability. Many do not meet the Australian physical activity guidelines.23
  • Western Australian state sporting associations employ over 1,200 employees and have over 110,000 volunteers engaged in the supporting infrastructure.24
  • In 2008, less than one-half (41.2%) of the primary school boys and 27.4% of primary school girls surveyed participated in a daily 60 minutes or more of physical activity.25
  • The findings of the report into Physical Activity Levels of Western Australian Adults found that 60% of WA adults participate in sufficient levels of physical activity, while 28% are insufficiently active and 12% inactive (report no PA). Sufficient physical activity is classified as 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity on five or more sessions or 60 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity per week (excluding gardening and household chores).26
  • More than one-half of Western Australians are now overweight or obese, this is a 6% increase since 2006.27

Social

  • WA faces demographic challenges including population growth with regional variation, population ageing, pockets of disadvantaged and a significant gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal outcomes.
  • ‘Digital divide’ – unequal access to information and communications technology among some parts of the community. As the Internet becomes more widespread, groups without access may not have the full opportunities to participate in social, economic and political life.
  • Unprecedented growth in prisoner population presents significant challenges.
  • People from more than 200 different countries live, work and study in Western Australia, speaking as many as 270 languages and identifying with more than 100 religious faiths.

Environmental

  • By 2031, Western Australia will be home to an estimated 2.87 million people.
  • Rapid population growth and its impacts including urban sprawl, biodiversity loss and pressure on non-renewable resources.
  • The issues associated with climate change, sustainability and natural resource management are significant challenges.
  • Statewide sustainability of sport and recreation infrastructure and public open space; water use and efficiency; and recreational access to water catchments

Political

  • Impact of the Economic Audit Committee Report (EACR) and the emphasis on partnerships between the government, business and the community sectors.
  • Council of Australian Governments (COAG) will strongly influence investment by the Commonwealth and states. A trend towards more centralised policy setting and resourcing may impact on WA’s ability to adapt and respond to unique challenges.
  • Strong regional investment through Royalties for Regions.
  • Local government moving towards adopting an approach to sustainability which embraces social, environmental, economic, financial and cultural aspects with a shift to more regionally defined processes and platforms for delivery.
  • Growing pressure on the health budget and long-term
    sustainability.

Economic

  • Economic growth coupled with economic uncertainty.
  • Multi-speed economy.
  • Growing divide between the rich and the poor.
  • Inter-industry disparity, with hardship for non-mining sectors.
  • Annual cost of obesity in Australia, including health system costs, net cost of lost wellbeing, productivity and carers cost was estimated to be $58.2 billion.

Appendix B: Consultations

SD5 was developed via extensive consultation with a number of key stakeholders from across the sport and recreation industry, government and the broader community. Over 370 responses were received via an online survey from a cross section of industry representatives across outdoor sport and recreation organisations, community groups, local government and academic institutions. Interviews and discussion forums were conducted with the following organisations and key stakeholders:

Organisations

  • Athletics WA
  • Baseball WA
  • Bowls WA
  • Commissioner for Children and Young People (Office)
  • Department for Child Protection
  • Department for Communities
  • Department of Corrective Services
  • Department of Culture and Arts
  • Department of Education
  • Department of Environment
  • Department of Health
  • Department of Indigenous Affairs
  • Department of Local Government
  • Department of Planning
  • Department of Regional Development and Lands
  • Department of Sport and Recreation
  • Department of State Development
  • Department of the Premier and Cabinet
  • Department of Transport
  • Disabilities Services Commission
  • Equestrian WA
  • EventsCorp
  • Football West
  • Gymnastics WA
  • Great Southern Recreation Advisory Council and industry representatives
  • Lotterywest
  • Netball WA
  • Physical Activity Taskforce
  • Rugby League
  • Surf Lifesaving WA
  • Surfing WA
  • Tennis West
  • Triathlon WA
  • VenuesWest
  • WA Basketball Federation
  • WA Cricket Association
  • WA Cycling Federation
  • WA Golf Association
  • WA Hockey Association
  • WA Institute of Sport
  • WA Police
  • WA Rugby Union Association
  • WA Sports Federation
  • WA Swimming Association
  • WA Volleyball Association
  • Western Australian Alcohol and Drug Authority
  • Western Australian Tourism Commission
  • Yachting WA

Stakeholders

  • Ms Michele Dolin – GESB
  • Ms Sally Carbon OAM – Australian Sports Commission
  • Prof Allan Robson AM – UWA
  • Prof Fiona Wood FRACS, FRCS, AM – McComb Foundation
  • Mr John Langoulant OA – Oakajee P&R
  • Ms Diane Smith-Gander – Wesfarmers
  • Ms Dixie Marshall – Channel 9
  • Mr Frank Pyke – Academic
  • Mr James Pearson – Chamber of Commerce and Industry
  • Dr Richard Charlesworth – Australian Institute of Sport

Written submissions were received from

  • Goldfields-Esperance Development Commission
  • Kimberley Development Commission
  • Midwest Development Commission
  • Recreation Custodians (LIWA Aquatics; Fitness WA; Outdoors WA; PLA (WA); Tracks & Trails WA; WASF; DSR)
  • Shire of Merredin
  • Wheelchair Sports WA

References

  • Access Economics Pty Ltd. (2008). The growing cost of obesity in 2008: three years on. Canberra: Diabetes Australia.
  • Atherley, K. (2006). Sport anPutting nature back into nurture: a literature review prepared for the Department of Sport and Recreation. Government d community cohesion in the 21st century: understanding linkages between sport, social capital and the community. Perth, Western Australia: Department of Sport and Recreation.
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics (2011) – Australian Demographic Statistics, June 2010. Cat No. 3101.0. Canberra: Author. Retrieved on the 24 March 2011.
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics (2011) Voluntary Work, Australia, 2006. Cat No.4441.0 Canberra: Author. Retrieved on the 24 March 2011.
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2003). Household use of information technology 2001–02, Cat. No. 8146.0. Canberra: Author. Retrieved in November 2010.
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2004). Involvement in organised sport and physical activity Cat. No. 6285.0. Canberra:Author. Retrieved in November 2010.
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2007). Motivators and constraints to participation in sports and physical recreation in Cat no. 4156.0 as a feature article from participation in sport and recreation. Canberra: Standing Committee on Recreation and Sport. Retrieved in December 2010.
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics (2009). National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social survey, cat. No 4714.0. Canberra: Author. Retrieved in December 2010.
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2009). National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social survey, cat. No 4714.0. Canberra: Author. Retrieved in December 2010.
  • Australian Social Inclusion Board (2010) Social Inclusion in Australia: How Australia is faring. Retrieved on 15 January 2011.
  • Chandler, G (2010). State sporting associations learning and workforce development project; review into the learning and workforce development needs of the state sporting Associations in Western Australia for The Department of Sport and Recreation, WASF and FutureNow.
  • Department of Sport and Recreation. (2005) SD4: Strategic directions for the Western Australian sport and recreation industry (2006-2010) Leederville, Western Australia: Department of Sport and Recreation.
  • Department of Sport and Recreation. (2009) More than winning: the real value of sport and recreation in Western Australia. Leederville, Western Australia: Department of Sport and Recreation.
  • Department of Sport and Recreation. (2005) Sport and Recreation it’s more than you think. Leederville, Western Australia: Department of Sport and Recreation.
  • Disability Services Commission (2011) Count me in: Disability Future Directions. Retrieved on the 15 March 2011.
  • Drummond M, Drummond C., Dollman J., Avery L. (2010). Physical activity from early childhood to adolescence: a literature review of issues and interventions in disadvantaged populations. Journal of Student Wellbeing Vol. 4 (2).
  • Government of Western Australia. (2009). Royalties for regions: putting it back into your community. Perth, Western Australia: Department of Regional Development and Lands. Retrieved in January 2011.
  • Government of Western Australia. (2010) Directions 2031 and beyond: draft spatial framework for Perth and Peel. Perth, Western Australia: Western Australian Planning Commission. Retrieved in January 2011.
  • Griffin University. (2008). Volunteers in sport: issues and Innovation. Sydney, New South Wales: Department of Sport and Recreation. Retrieved in November 2010.
  • G Street and R James. (2010). The Relationship between Organized Recreational Activity and Mental Health, Mentally Healthy WA, Centre for Behavioural Research in Cancer Control, Curtin University.
  • Dr K Martin. (2010) Sport and Physical Activity Enhance Children’s Learning, The University of Western Australia, School of Population Health.
  • Hughes, M., Tye, M., and Zulfa, M. (2010) The Right to Roam: A review of policy and management of public access to land. A report for the Department of Sport and Recreation WA, Perth. October 2010.
  • Independent Sport Panel Report (Crawford Report). (2009). The future of sport in Australia. Canberra: Commonwealth Government of Australia.
  • Langoulant, J. (March 3, 2011). WA business outlook. Presentation from the Economic and Political series. Perth: Committee for Economic Development of Australia.
  • Laureus Sport for Good Foundation. (2011). Teenage kicks: the value of sport in tackling youth crime. London, United Kingdom: Author. Retrieved in February 2011.
  • Martin, K, Dr. (2010). Putting nature back into nurture: a literature review prepared for the Department of Sport and Recreation. Government of Western Australia: Department of Sport and Recreation.
  • Martin, K., Rosenberg, M., Miller, M., French, S., McCormack, G., Bull, F., Giles-Corti, B., Pratt, S. (2008) Move and Munch Final Report. Trends in physical activity, nutrition and body size in Western Australian children and adolescents: the Child and Adolescent Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey (CAPANS).
  • Middle, G., Tye, M., and Middle, I., Emerging Constraints for Public Open Space in Perth Metropolitan Suburbs: Implications of Bush Forever, Water Sensitive Urban Design and Liveable Neighbourhoods for Active Sport and Recreation. A report for the Department of Sport and Recreation WA. Perth. September 2010.
  • M, Mills C, McCormack G, Martin K, Grove B, Pratt S and Braham R. Physical Activity Levels of Western Australian Adults 2009: Findings from the Physical Activity Taskforce Adult Physical Activity Survey. Health Promotion Evaluation Unit, University of Western Australia, Perth, 2010.
  • Nexus Strategic Solutions (2010). Children and Young People’s Views on Wellbeing. Report for the Commissioner of Children and Young People. Perth, Western Australia: Retrieved on the 7 April 2011.
  • Packer, T.L., Briffa, T., Downs, J., Ciccarelli, M., and Passmore, A. (2006). The physical activity study of children and adolescents with a disability. Perth: Western Australia: Curtin University of Technology.
  • Public Sector Commission (2009) Premiers Awards 09: for excellence in public sector management. Retrieved on the 14 March 2011.
  • Rosenberg M, Mills C, McCormack G, Martin K, Grove B, Pratt S and Braham R. Physical Activity Levels of Western Australian Adults 2009: Findings from the Physical Activity Taskforce Adult Physical Activity Survey. Health Promotion Evaluation Unit, University of Western Australia, Perth, 2010.
  • Service Skills Australia. (2010). Getting on track for change: A workforce development strategy for the sport and recreation industry. Service Skills Australia.
  • The Smith Family, (2010) Opening Doors: The role of sponsorship in addressing disadvantage. Retrieved on the 14 March 2011.
  • Vinson, T., Rawthorne, M., Cooper, B (2007) Dropping off the edge: the distribution of disadvantage in Australia. Richmond, Vic.: Jesuit Social Services; The Smith Family, (2010) Opening Doors: The role of sponsorship in addressing disadvantage. Retrieved on the 15 March 2011.
  • Volunteering Australia. (2004) Snapshot 2004: volunteering report card. Melbourne, Victoria: Volunteering Australia. Retrieved in January 2011
  • Western Australian Council of Social Services. (2011) Retrieved on the 14 March 2011.

Footnotes

  1. Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2007). Motivators and constraints to participation in sports and physical recreation in Cat no. 4156.0 as a feature article from participation in sport and recreation. Canberra: Standing Committee on Recreation and Sport.
  2. Laureus Sport for Good Foundation. (2011). Teenage kicks: the value of sport in tackling youth crime. London, United Kingdom: Author. Retrieved in February 2011.
  3. Australian Bureau of Statistics 2003, Household Use of Information Technology 2001–02, cat. no. 8146.0, ABS, Canberra.
  4. Australian Social Inclusion Board (2010) Social Inclusion in Australia: How Australia is faring.Australian Social Inclusion Board (2010) Social Inclusion in Australia: How Australia is faring. Retrieved on the 15 January 2011.
  5. Martin, K, Dr. (2010). Putting nature back into nurture: a literature review prepared for the Department of Sport and Recreation. Government of Western Australia: Department of Sport and Recreation.
  6. Department of Sport and Recreation. (2009). More than winning, the real value of sport and recreation in Western Australia, Leederville, Western Australia: Department of Sport and Recreation.
  7. M, Mills C, McCormack G, Martin K, Grove B, Pratt S and Braham R. Physical Activity Levels of Western Australian Adults 2009: Findings from the Physical Activity Taskforce Adult Physical Activity Survey. Health Promotion Evaluation Unit, University of Western Australia, Perth, 2010.
  8. Langoulant, J. (March 3, 2011). WA business outlook. Presentation from the Economic and Political series. Perth: Committee for Economic Development of Australia.
  9. Chandler, G. (2010). State sporting associations Learning and Workforce Development Project. A Report prepared for the Department of Sport and Recreation, Future Now and WA Sports Federation.
  10. Griffin University. (2008). Volunteers in sport: issues and Innovation. Sydney, New South Wales: Department of Sport and Recreation.
  11. Atherley, K. (2006). Sport and Community Cohesion in the 21st Century: Understanding linkages between sport, social capital and the community. Perth, Western Australia: Department of Sport and Recreation, 7-10.
  12. Public Sector Commission (2009) Premiers Awards 09: for excellence in public sector management. Retrieved on the 14 March 2011
  13. Government of Western Australia (2009). Royalties for Regions. Putting it back into your community. Perth, Western Australia: Department of Regional Development and Lands, 5.
  14. Middle, G., Tye, M., and Middle, I. (2010). Emerging Constraints for Public Open Space in Perth Metropolitan Suburbs: Implications of Bush Forever, Water Sensitive Urban Design and Liveable Neighbourhoods for Active Sport and Recreation. A report for the Department of Sport and Recreation WA. Perth.
  15. Hughes, M., Tye, M., and Zulfa, M. (2010) The Right to Roam: A review of policy and management of public access to land. A report for the Department of Sport and Recreation WA, Perth.
  16. Government of Western Australia (2009). Directions 2031. Draft Spatial Framework for Perth and Peel. Perth, Western Australia: Western Australian Planning Commission.
  17. Independent Sport Panel Report (Crawford Report). (2009). The future of sport in Australia. Canberra: Commonwealth Government of Australia.
  18. Standing Committee on Recreation and Sport. (2010). Participation in exercise, recreation and sport: annual report 2009. Canberra: Australian Sports
    Commission.
  19. Ibid.
  20. Ibid.
  21. Access Economics. (2008). The growing cost of obesity in 2008: three years on. Canberra: Diabetes Australia.
  22. Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2009). National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social survey, 2008. Canberra: Author.
  23. Packer, T.L., Briffa, T., Downs, J., Ciccarelli, M., and Passmore, A. (2006). The Physical Activity Study of Children and Adolescents with a Disability. Curtin University of Technology.
  24. Chandler, G (2010). State sporting associations learning and workforce development project; review into the learning and workforce development needs of the state sporting associations in Western Australia. Perth, WA: The Department of Sport and Recreation, WASF and FutureNow.
  25. Martin, K., Rosenberg, M., Miller, M., French, S., McCormack, G., Bull, F., Giles-Corti, B., Pratt, S. (2008). Move and munch final report: trends in physical activity, nutrition and body size in Western Australian children and adolescents: the Child and Adolescent Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey (CAPANS). Perth, Western Australia: Health Promotion Evaluation Unit, The University of Western Australia.
  26. Rosenberg, M., Mills, C., McCormack, G., Martin, K., Grove, B., Pratt, S., & Braham, R. (2010). Physical activity levels of Western Australian adults 2009: findings from the physical activity taskforce adult physical activity survey. Physical activity levels of Western Australian adults 2009: findings from the physical activity taskforce adult physical activity survey. Perth, Western Australia: Health Promotion Evaluation Unit, The University of Western Australia.
  27. Ibid, p.iii.